Volcanoes Erupting Around the World

from National Geographic:

Photo of Mount Tavurvur erupting in eastern Papua New Guinea.

Mount Tavurvur erupts in eastern Papua New Guinea on Friday. PHOTOGRAPH BY OLIVER BLUETT, AFP/GETTY

The Mount Tavurvur volcano in eastern Papua New Guinea jolted awake early Friday morning, belching rocks, ash, and steam (see above) nearly 60,000 feet (18,288 meters) into the air.

Local residents evacuated their homes on Friday, and Qantas Airways modified flight paths for planes heading to Tokyo and Shanghai from Sydney, Australia, according to news reports. (Watch video: “Volcano 101.”)

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When Will the Big One Hit?

Next year residents of Los Angeles will flock to cinemas to see a blockbuster called San Andreas in which their city will be wiped out by an apocalyptic earthquake.

Kylie Minogue and Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, one of Hollywood’s current most bankable stars, will be seen roaming the wreckage after the City of Angels is mercilessly flattened by the “Big One”.

As skyscrapers collapse, thousands die and chaos ensues, most of those in the audience will be wondering how long before it happens for real.

The southern section of the San Andreas fault that runs near the city has not had a “mega-quake” of more than magnitude-7.5 since 1680 and it is, according to seismologists, more than a century overdue.

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The Liberal Policy That May Kill Us All

by: the Common Constitutionalist

I enjoy watching TV shows chronicling natural disasters. I’m fascinated by them as apparently a lot of us are. These programs are very popular. Hurricanes, tornadoes, tsunamis, volcanoes and earthquakes.

Yes, the results of these disasters can be tragic and the suffering caused by them can be unimaginable, but these phenomena are still fascinating to a lot of us.

A recent example of these programs was rebroadcast just the other day on the History Channel. It was entitled Megaquake 10.0. The premise of the show was to examine and compare past powerful earthquakes and the destruction they cause, to a magnitude 10.0 Megaquake, with as much as 30 times more devastating force then most recent major earthquakes. read more

Armored Tornado Chaser

Iowa tornado chasers have a new weapon to help them hunt twisters this Spring – an armored vehicle that will allow them to possibly get inside one of the beasts.

Storm buffs Brannan Jontz and Dan Auel, both 20, built the steel-plated vehicle named ‘Dorothy’ with flaps designed to lower and keep winds from getting under them.

Dorothy has yet to be field-tested, but meteorology student Zach Sharpe unveiled her during this week’s Des Moines St Patrick’s Day parade.

Tornado hunter: 'Dorothy'  is built to go inside tornadoes

 

‘Once you get in a tornado, all you see is debris flying around so the main goal is to get close, get slow motion video of the tornado, slow it down and analyze the data,’ Sharpe told KCCI. read more

Historic Landslide

One of the largest natural landslides in recent years took place in a remote area of southeastern Alaska on February 16, when 68 million tonnes of rock and debris crashed down a mountainside leaving deposits 40 foot deep.

Large landslides in remote locations used to go unnoticed, but a new crowdsourcing approach involving a UK-based blogger, an Alaskan helicopter pilot and NASA, helped scientists pinpoint the exact location of this latest slide.

This innovative new approach is the result of the discovery last year by two Columbia University scientists that seismic data can reveal the time, force, direction, and speed of a large landslide.

Unlike earthquakes, which release bursts of energy for a few seconds, landslides create sustained seismic readings that can last many minutes.

 

One of the largest natural landslides in recent years took place in a remote area of southeastern Alaska on February 16, when 68 million tonnes of rock and debris crashed down a mountainside leaving deposits 40 foot deep
One of the largest natural landslides in recent years took place in a remote area of southeastern Alaska on February 16, when 68 million tonnes of rock and debris crashed down a mountainside leaving deposits 40 foot deep read more