Is This Superbugs Achilles Heal?

Researchers have found that bacteria-killing viruses could help make superbugs susceptible to antibiotics once again
Researchers have found that bacteria-killing viruses could help make superbugs susceptible to antibiotics once again

Viruses firmly hold the world’s attention at the moment, but we shouldn’t ignore the rising health threat that bacteria pose, too. The crafty critters are fast evolving resistance to antibiotics, meaning our best drugs could soon stop working entirely. Now researchers in Australia have found a way to bypass drug resistance in these so-called superbugs – by distracting them with predatory viruses.

read more

See I Told You So – No New COVID Strain

by: Brent Smith

I rarely toot my own horn, but I’m going to make an exception for this, because it’s just so utterly egregious!

A week ago I posted my weekly exclusive article for World Net Daily.

It was entitled: “Sorry, but I don’t Believe in the ‘New Strain’ of Coronavirus – Not Yet Anyway”

If you missed it, you may link to it here.

In it I stated:

But just when people are beginning to breathe a sigh of relief, there are reports of a new, even worse, strain of the coronavirus.

In years gone by I doubt I would have questioned the validity of such a claim made by the “experts.”

But, after all the misstatements, half-truths and outright lies we’ve been fed, not only scientifically and medically, but politically, in regards to the election, I’m finding it increasing difficult to believe that a new, mutated strain of the virus has been discovered, just as the vaccine is being widely distributed.

In other words, I thought the experts were lying once again – that I didn’t believe there was even a “new strain” of coronavirus, at least not in the U.S. I was called a wacko conspiracy theorist for saying so.

But now, a week later, the CDC is saying the same thing.

from the Blaze:

CDC says reports of a new strain of coronavirus in the US are false, contradicting Dr. Birx read more

Repellent Better than DEET

The introduced bacteria will both mask odors produced by bacteria in the skin's microbiome, along with producing repellent odors of their own
The introduced bacteria will both mask odors produced by bacteria in the skin’s microbiome, along with producing repellent odors of their own
dragi52/Depositphotos

DEET may be an effective mosquito repellent, but it can cause irritation, and has to be reapplied every few hours. Scientists are now working on a more innocuous, longer-laster alternative, that involves introducing genetically engineered bacteria to people’s skin.

read more

WND Exclusive – Sorry, but I don’t Believe in the ‘New Strain’ of Coronavirus – Not Yet Anyway

from Brent Smith for World Net Daily:

With everything we’ve experienced this past year, I feel myself growing more cynical and, frankly, a bit misanthropic.

I recently recorded a podcast where I described my disappointment at how easily the vast majority of people just accepted the ridiculous mandates and governmental edicts and did so, quite willingly, because of safety.

For we know there is no higher purpose of government than to keep us safe, at all cost, despite ourselves.

We just keep complying with all the nonsense, even after everything we’ve witnessed, all the proven misinformation and shifting goalposts. read more

Video Podcast – That’s not the COVID Vaccine – Liking Ron DeSantis

by: Brent Smith

Being former military myself, you know I have great respect for those who serve, in whatever capacity.

Drone pilot, office clerk, door kicker, whatever. You joined to serve.

But there are some things the military shouldn’t be doing and is best left to civilians.

This is one of them – administering the COVID vaccine to civilians, or not, as it were.

I’m becoming a fan of Florida Governor Ron DeSantis. And what he said about getting the COVID vaccine certainly doesn’t hurt his standing among conservatives, or frankly anyone with a head and a heart. read more

Paint-On Bandage Measures Oxygen Levels

A new glowing bandage could help reduce the rates of failed tissue transplants
A new glowing bandage could help reduce the rates of failed tissue transplants

Getting transplanted tissue to behave like the original tissue isn’t always a smooth process, and one of the things physicians look out for following a procedure is how well it takes in oxygen. Wired devices called oximeters are the gold standard when it comes to monitoring this in recovering patients, but scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) may have found a better way forward in a paint-on bandage that glows in response to the levels of oxygen in the tissue.

read more

Sleep Disruptions may Link to Alzheimer’s progression

Immune cells known as microglia (turquoise with red dots) surrounding amyloid plaques
Immune cells known as microglia (turquoise with red dots) surrounding amyloid plaques
Brian Lananna

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine (WUSM) in St. Louis have spent some years investigating the links between circadian rhythm and Alzheimer’s, and have recently been making some real inroads. Following a 2018 study demonstrating how disrupted sleep can accelerate the buildup of toxic plaques associated with the disease, the team has now identified a protein implicated in the progression of the disease that appears highly regulated by the circadian rhythm, helping them join the dots and providing a potential new therapeutic target.

read more

The COVID Vaccine will Change Everything – NOT

by: Brent Smith

It was a stormy Monday. I remember it well, as this particular Monday was different from all other Mondays. And I do remember it well for its momentousness and that it was just day before yesterday. Can you recall where you were when you heard the news that Sandra Lindsay, an ICU nurse at Long Island Jewish Medical Center in Queens, New York City, was the first American to receive the COVID vaccine?

I was in my office, some 250 miles away, but would swear that I heard trumpets sound as they hailed the end of the COVID scourge. Maybe it wasn’t trumpets. Maybe it was the feckless dronings of America’s worst Governor, Andrew Cuomo, as he tried to horn in on the action, congratulating those involved as if they were Neil Armstrong after his first Moon walk. read more

Telomeres May Control Aging and Cancer

Telomeres, the protective caps on the tips of chromosomes, have been linked to both aging and cancer
Telomeres, the protective caps on the tips of chromosomes, have been linked to both aging and cancer

It’s long been thought that our cells stop dividing as we age as a natural preventative measure against cancer. Now a new study has found an intriguing piece of evidence supporting this hypothesis in genomes from several families that seem to be particularly prone to cancer.

read more

Breakthrough – Self-Regulating Insulin

An experimental self-regulating insulin molecule has been demonstrated in animals
An experimental self-regulating insulin molecule has been demonstrated in animals

An incredible proof-of-concept study from a team of European scientists has demonstrated the development of a novel insulin molecule that can sense blood sugar levels and self-adjust its activity in response to a patient’s needs. The experimental molecule has only been tested in animals so far but the researchers are hopeful further development will offer diabetics a safer and easier insulin therapy in the future.

read more