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Reversing Type 2 Diabetes

Reducing pancreatic fat can be highly effective in the treatment of diabetes
Reducing pancreatic fat can be highly effective in the treatment of diabetes (Credit:Shutterstock)

A new study at Newcastle University in the UK has improved our understanding of Type 2 diabetes, providing a new insight into the positive effects that weight loss can have on sufferers. According to the researchers, reversing the condition can be as simple as losing a single gram of fat in the right place. read more

Beginning to Unravel Alzheimer’s

It was found that levels of a key protein were lower in the synapses of Alzheimer's ...
It was found that levels of a key protein were lower in the synapses of Alzheimer’s sufferers than in those of healthy subjects (Credit: Shutterstock)

A research team led by scientists from the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Australia has studied the mechanism by which connections in the brain are destroyed in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. The findings represent another angle of attack in the ongoing battle to find a cure for the widespread degenerative condition. read more

Switching Off Genes to Stop Cancer

This is Better than Science Fiction!

The researchers have turned off genes associated with five different cancer cell lines
The researchers have turned off genes associated with five different cancer cell lines (Credit: Shutterstock)

A team of University of Toronto researchers has worked through the human genome, switching off genes in an effort to map out those essential in keeping our cells alive. The scientists were able to identify sets of genes associated with specific cancers, paving the way for highly targeted treatments. read more

Harness Body Movement to Produce Electricity

A piece of silicone rubber imprinted with super-thin material that generates electricity when flexed could provide ...

A piece of silicone rubber imprinted with super-thin material that generates electricity when flexed could provide a source of power for mobile and medical devices (Image credit: Frank Wojciechowski)

Engineers from Princeton University have developed power-generating rubber films that could be used to harness natural body movements such as breathing or walking in order to power electronic devices such as pacemakers or mobile phones. The material, which is composed of ceramic nanoribbons embedded onto silicone rubber sheets, generates electricity when flexed and is highly efficient at converting mechanical energy into electrical energy. read more

New Cancer Killer White Blood Cells

Injecting white blood cells with a special protein transforms them in to ‘super natural killer cells’, that can wipe out cancer, experts have revealed.

The specially engineered cells have the ability to seek out diseased cells in lymph nodes, with one purpose: destroy them.

The breakthrough by biomedical scientists at Cornell University, could stop the disease in its tracks, by preventing it from spreading.

‘We want to see lymph node metastasis become a thing of the past,’ said Michael King, the Daljit S, and Elaine Sarkaria, professor of biomedical engineering and senior author of the paper. read more

Electronic Skin Can Detect Changes in Both Temperature and Pressure

The unique way in which our fingertips can detect changes in both temperature and pressure have been reproduced in an electronic ‘skin’.

In tests, the grooves in the e-skin were able to respond to water droplets running across them and could detect when a human hair was placed on their surface.

The breakthrough could be used to make more life-like prostheses or improve the accuracy of wearable sensors and medical diagnostic devices.

The electronic skin (illustrated) was developed by researchers at the Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, led by Professor Jonghwa Park. By adding composites made of a polymer and reduced graphene oxide, the films are able to detect touch and temperature using sensing electric charges

read more

A Patch Can Repair Your Heart

A protein patch has been shown to regenerate heart tissue in animals (Credit: Shutterstock)

A protein patch has been shown to regenerate heart tissue in animals (Credit:Shutterstock)

Though sufferers of heart attacks may survive the initial event, they cause permanent damage to the organ in the form of scar tissue, which affects its ability to pump blood. Scientists around the world are working on this problem, with hydrogels, human stem cells and even bioengineered tissue that sticks together like Velcro all offering possible solutions. read more

Blowing up Another Food Myth

by: the Common Constitutionalist

Food allergies have been on the rise in recent years. Some reports show that as much as 10% of children in developed nations are affected. And peanut allergies seem to be the most prevalent.

Searching the Internet, one can find dozens of near death allergic reactions to peanuts – and a lot of these experiences center around airlines and the ubiquitous bag of complementary salty treats.

In August 2013, a woman and her son refused to board a United Airlines flight from Denver to Newark due to her nine-year-olds severe peanut allergy. It seems the agent at the gate told the mom that “the crew would not make an onboard announcement about Joshua’s allergy.”

The mother, Lianne Mandelbaum “had seen other passengers eating peanuts while waiting to board, and she concluded that the flight would be dangerous for Joshua.”

A few months later she launched a website, asking “that airlines ‘institute a bill of rights’ for food allergic passengers. Those rights would require airlines to create buffer zones, of at least three rows in front and three rows in back, of the row where an allergic passenger is seated. Airlines would not serve products containing nuts within the buffer zone. Also, flight crews would ask passengers in the zone to refrain from eating any products with nuts.”

Well that’s all fine and good, but then I found this. Just last week, on a Ryanair flight, “a group of passengers were converging menacingly on a Zimbabwean man they accused of trying to kill” a four-year-old girl. read more

The Paralyzed Can Walk Again?

Five paralyzed men treated with a non-invasive form of spinal stimulation gained significant voluntary movement of their legsFive paralyzed men treated with a non-invasive form of spinal stimulation gained significant voluntary movement of their legs (Credit: Neuromuscular Research Laboratory/UCLA)

 

Five men with complete motor paralysis have regained the ability to move their legs voluntarily and produce step-like movements after being treated with a non-invasive form of spinal cord stimulation. The new treatment builds on prior work to generate voluntary movements in paralyzed people through electrical stimulation – in particular, two studies (one completed in 2011, the other in 2014) that involved surgically implanting an electrode array on the spinal cord. This time, however, the researchers found success without performing any invasive surgery. read more