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Universal Cancer Cure

Engineering immune cells to attack cancer is a form of treatment that is showing great promise, but it is complex because it involves extracting and modifying T cells before injecting them back into the body. Scientists have now demonstrated a way to not just arm immune cells while still inside the body, but equip them with the ability to fight any kind of cancer, providing an early proof-of-concept for a cheap, universal vaccine for the deadly disease. read more

How About Just Starving the Tumor?

The team identified and cut off access to an essential supply of cancer cell nutrients, reducing ...

The team identified and cut off access to an essential supply of cancer cell nutrients, reducing growth by an astonishing 96 percent.

There are more than 900 different types of cancer currently identified, and many of them require very specific treatments, and can become resistant to chemotherapy as time goes on. read more

Adding Eggs to Electronics

The clear albumen surrounding an egg's yolk was spun into a super-thin wafer used in a ...

The clear albumen surrounding an egg’s yolk was spun into a super-thin wafer used in a degradable chip known as a memristor

Durability is often touted as the hallmark of good electronics, but sometimes you want components that don’t last all that long. For example, it would be handy if microelectronic systems that delivered drugs to various parts of the body dissolved after their task was done. Or if sensors that monitor pollution simply dissolved after they were finished reporting, rather than contributing to even more environmentally-damaging material. A team of researchers from the UK and China has just figured out how to create one such chip out of eggs. read more

The Paralyzed Will Walk Within 20 Years

People paralysed from the neck down will soon be able to move robotic arms by thought alone thanks to wi-fi, according to a world-leading expert.

The first patients will be implanted with the devices by 2018, Professor John Donoghue told The Mail on Sunday.

And in about 20 years patients will be living relatively normal lives as neuro-communication technology restores movement to all four limbs, he predicts. read more

DNA Sequences The Answer to Regrowing Body Parts

The researchers say the newly discovered sequences could one day give a great boost to mammals' ...

The researchers say the newly discovered sequences could one day give a great boost to mammals’ ability to regrow damaged tissue or body parts.

Animals that regrow body parts like zebrafish and newts certainly function very differently to the way humans do, but we might one day be able to borrow some of these traits. A closer look at the mechanism driving these remarkable regenerative abilities has suggested that they could be recreated in mice, with the scientists involved hopeful it could ultimately improve our capacity to regrow damaged body parts. read more

Greater Understanding of Diabetes

The study found evidence that genetics affect insulin-producing beta cells (stained green in this image), paving ...

The study found evidence that genetics affect insulin-producing beta cells (stained green in this image), paving the way for potential new treatments in the future (Credit: Masur).

Diabetes is a widespread health problem, affecting some 400 million people across the planet. With that number only set to rise, it’s important that we find new treatments as quickly as possible. Researchers at the University of Montreal are making significant progress in that regard, discovering a common genetic defect in beta cells that may be a big factor in both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. read more

Doctors Are Again Using Maggots to Treat Patients

Modern medicine may be upgrading centuries-old techniques to repair wounds that just won’t heal.

Researchers from North Carolina State University and Massey University in New Zealand have found that genetically engineered maggots can clean non-healing wounds and promote cell growth.

This is done using a human growth factor, which the maggots secrete while removing dead tissue.

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What Your Saliva Says About You

Your saliva is possibly not something you have given much thought to – but it plays a vital role in maintaining good health, says Gordon Proctor, a professor in salivary biology at King’s College, London.

‘Saliva is a remarkable substance. It might be 99 per cent water, but it is far more than that,’ he says.

In fact, saliva carries the same bacteria found in your gut, as well as powerful substances that fight germs and promote wound healing – which might be why we instinctively pop our finger in our mouth if we cut or graze it.

Saliva has been used to detect occurences of human papilloma virus - and now, to detect serious disease

Now, it is being used to detect serious disease. The University of California, Los Angeles recently announced that it had developed a £15 saliva test to spot early-stage lung cancer before it can be detected with a blood test.

The test looks for fragments of tumor DNA in a single drop of saliva, and can give a result in less than ten minutes.

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Patients Could Receive Organs From ANY Donor

A new procedure, which alters a person’s immune system, could offer a breakthrough in transplant surgery allowing patients to receive kidneys from incompatible donors, experts have revealed.

Patients are currently forced to wait for a kidney to become available from a deceased donor.

And, in order for the operation to have a chance of success, that donor must be an absolute match, with anything less raising the chances of the body rejecting the new organ. read more