Google+

Lung Cancer Advancements

A chance meeting may lead to a combination therapy that actually reduces side effect damage while...
A chance meeting may lead to a combination therapy that actually reduces side effect damage while improving effectiveness of chemotherapy in the treatment of lung cancer(Credit: muratart/Depositphotos)

Cancer treatment is often a case of robbing Peter to pay Paul. You may well have some success with chemotherapy, but subsequent damage to otherwise healthy organs and tissue is a trade-off that clinicians and patients have had to juggle with for decades. But, thanks to a chance meeting at the Hudson Institute in Melbourne, lung cancer patients could be looking at more effective chemo with fewer side effects. read more

Gut Bacteria Alters Metabolism

Researchers have found that removing a single gene from a gut bacteria species can have dramatic...
Researchers have found that removing a single gene from a gut bacteria species can have dramatic effects in the host’s metabolism(Credit: AnatomyInsider/Depositphotos)

The bacteria that call your gut home can have a tremendous impact on your overall health, but exactly how the bugs do so is a web that’s still being untangled. To investigate, researchers at Harvard Medical School have deleted a single gene from one gut bacteria species and found that it alters the metabolism of the host, reducing their weight gain. read more

Smart Bandage Monitors Chronic Skin Wounds

The prototype smart bandage, with its microprocessor visible at left
The prototype smart bandage, with its microprocessor visible at left(Credit: NanoLab – Sameer Sonkusale, Tufts University)

Chronic skin wounds may be notoriously difficult to treat, but at the same time they shouldn’t be over-treated, subjecting patients to more antibiotics than is necessary. That’s why scientists have developed a “smart” bandage that only dispenses medication as needed. read more

New Drug may be Able to Reverse Age-Related Dementia and Stroke

A new discovery into the mechanism behind cerebral small vessel disease may offer new treatments to...
A new discovery into the mechanism behind cerebral small vessel disease may offer new treatments to prevent or even repair damage associated with age-related dementia(Credit:Giovanni_Cancemi/Depositphotos)

Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is one of the most commonly associated causes of age-related dementia and stroke. New research, led by the University of Edinburgh, may have finally uncovered the mechanism by which SVD causes brain cell damage, as well as a potential treatment to prevent the damage, and possibly even reverse it. read more

No More Finger-Pricking for Diabetics?

Thanks to a radar-based system that's currently in development, doing THIS may someday no longer be...
Thanks to a radar-based system that’s currently in development, doing THIS may someday no longer be necessary(Credit: dml5050/Depositphotos)

Although finger-prick blood glucose tests are a daily necessity for millions of diabetics, a less-painful alternative may be on the horizon. Led by Prof. George Shaker, a team from Canada’s University of Waterloo is looking at using radar and artificial intelligence (AI) to do the job. read more

Nanoparticles Heat Up and Kill Cancer

A transmission electron microscope image of the zinc ferrite nanoparticles that can be triggered by a...
A transmission electron microscope image of the zinc ferrite nanoparticles that can be triggered by a magnetic field to heat up and kill cancer(Credit: Xiang Yu)

Cancer is one of humanity’s biggest killers, but scientists are coming up with some creative ways to fight back. Researchers at the University at Buffalo have developed new kinds of nanoparticles that can infiltrate, heat up and kill cancer cells more effectively and efficiently than similar methods. read more

New Drug for RET-Driven Cancers

A new cancer drug, known as BLU-667, has shown promise in human clinical trials
A new cancer drug, known as BLU-667, has shown promise in human clinical trials(Credit: vitanovski/Depositphotos)

A new cancer drug known as cancer drug has moved through phase I human trials, and the results are promising. Taken orally, the drug targets what are known as RET-driven cancers, including types of thyroid and lung cancers, which are normally hard to treat. read more

Spider Silk Helps Cancer Treatment

Immune cells that have absorbed nanoparticles of spider silk (green), carrying peptides for potential cancer vaccines
Immune cells that have absorbed nanoparticles of spider silk (green), carrying peptides for potential cancer vaccines(Credit: Laboratoire Bourquin – UNIGE)

Strong and light, spider silk is one of the most impressive materials in the natural world. Both the real thing and synthetic versions have been used to improve everything from clothing to car seatscooling electronics to preserving produce, making sweet music or helping people hear it, and even patching up severed nerves. Now, scientists in Germany and Switzerland have found a new use for spider silk – wrapping up cancer drugs to protect them until they can reach their tumorous targets. read more

Discriminating Antibiotics

Researchers at Penn State have developed an antibiotic that targets a specific species of bad bacteria,...
Researchers at Penn State have developed an antibiotic that targets a specific species of bad bacteria, without harming the good ones in your gut(Credit: phodopus/Depositphotos)

Antibiotics are effective at killing bacteria (for now, at least), but they aren’t very picky, indiscriminately wiping out both good and bad bacteria. This can upset the fragile balance of your microbiome, which is increasingly being linked to general health and wellbeing. Now, researchers at Penn State have developed a new approach to make a drug that can single out a specific, opportunistic bacteria known as C. difficile. read more

First 3D Printed Human Corneas

Co-author Dr. Steve Swioklo (left) and Prof. Che Connon, with a 3D-printed cornea
Co-author Dr. Steve Swioklo (left) and Prof. Che Connon, with a 3D-printed cornea(Credit:Newcastle University)

There’s a limited supply of donor human corneas, meaning that not everyone who needs an eyesight-saving transplant can get one. As a result, biosynthetic corneas have recently been developed. These could become quicker and easier to produce, as scientists have now successfully 3D-printed the things. read more