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Vaccine to Help Alzheimer’s Patients

A new type of virus-like particle has been shown to improve Alzheimer’s symptoms in mice. Could...
A new type of virus-like particle has been shown to improve Alzheimer’s symptoms in mice. Could it one day work on humans too?(Credit: burdun/Depositphotos)

Alzheimer’s is a disease with a number of potential causes and therefore a number of potential targets for prevention. One of those centers on a protein call tau, which can gather in long tangles that kill off neurons in the brain. Scientists have developed what they describe as a vaccine to keep the brain clear of these dangerous clumps, and found that treating mice in this way helped stave off the kind of memory decline associated with the disease. read more

Hardened Arteries Mystery Solved

Uncovering the mechanism by which calcium deposits accumulte on the walls of arteries could help develop...
Uncovering the mechanism by which calcium deposits accumulate on the walls of arteries could help develop new treatments for everything from heart disease to dementia(Credit: Melinda Duer)

A landmark study, led by a team of scientists from King’s College London and the University of Cambridge, has described the mechanism responsible for the hardening of arteries. The research also points to a common antibiotic as a potential new treatment to prevent this condition. read more

Scorpion Venom’s Health Benefits

Scorpion venom has proven a rich source of medical discovery
Scorpion venom has proven a rich source of medical discovery(Credit: 312010/Depositphotos)

The venom of deadly animals mightn’t seem like a great place to look for life-saving medicines, but scientists are continually sifting through these toxins to discover compounds with huge potential. Now researchers at Stanford studying scorpion venom have identified a pair of compounds that were shown to kill off both staph and tuberculosis bacteria. And better yet, they were able to create synthetic versions in the lab. read more

The Gut-Brain Connection in Autism

The new research suggests fundamental links between our gut microbiome, our brain, and our behavior
The new research suggests fundamental links between our gut microbiome, our brain, and our behavior (Credit: Caltech)

Two fascinating new studies are shedding light on the association between the gut, the brain, and autism. The new research reveals how gastrointestinal problems can be triggered by the same gene mutations associated with autism, and a striking mouse study has demonstrated how a fecal transplant from humans with autism can promote autism-like behaviors in the animals. read more

The Fight Against Drug-Resistant Bacteria and Fungi

Existing drugs have been used to starve fungal infections of Candida albicans of nutrients
Existing drugs have been used to starve fungal infections of Candida albicans of nutrients(Credit: iLexx/Depositphotos)

Microorganisms like bacteria and fungi are increasingly becoming resistant to our best drugs, which is hurtling us towards a terrifying future where once-easily-treated infections become potentially life-threatening again. In a new approach to this problem, researchers from the University at Buffalo and Temple University have tested an alternative to antibiotics that uses existing drugs to starve a fungal infection of vital nutrients. read more

URGOnight Will Help You Sleep

The device uses neurofeedback to train the user into entering a brainwave state claimed to improve...
The device uses neurofeedback to train the user into entering a brainwave state claimed to improve sleep(Credit: URGOnight)

With a good night’s sleep being so important to our health, it’s not surprising to see so many gadgets designed to deliver us into the Land of Nod. URGOnight is a novel sleep training device designed to improve your ability to get to sleep, and stay asleep, through the use of neurofeedback and brain training. The system, comprising an EEG headset and accompanying mobile app, is currently crowdfunding on Indiegogo. read more

Keeping Up with Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria

Researchers have found a new way to weaken bacterial defenses against antibiotics
Researchers have found a new way to weaken bacterial defenses against antibiotics(Credit: exty/Depositphotos)

Bacteria are quickly evolving resistances to antibiotics, to the extent that our best drugs might not work in the terrifyingly-near future. Scientists are hard at work developing new antibiotics, or finding ways to make existing ones more effective. Now, researchers from Thomas Jefferson University have found a new way to weaken bacterial defenses, slowing down the development of antibiotic resistance. read more

New Teeth Cleaning Robots

With precise, controlled movements, the microrobot cleans biofilm off a glass plate
With precise, controlled movements, the microrobot cleans biofilm off a glass plate(Credit:Geelsu Hwang and Edward Steager)

An army of tiny robots scuttling about inside your mouth cleaning your teeth. It’s a disquieting thought, and yet it might be one of the most effective ways to deal with the sticky bacterial biofilms that coat our choppers – as well as water pipes, catheters and other tough-to-clean items. read more

AI Catheter to Assist Heart Surgeons

In a procedure known as a paravalvular aortic leak closure, the catheter is used to help...

In a procedure known as a paravalvular aortic leak closure, the catheter is used to help plug a leak in an artificial heart valve(Credit: Pierre Dupont / Boston Children’s Hospital)

For some time now, we’ve seen robotic surgical devices that can be remotely guided within the human body. And while they do make surgery more precise and less invasive, they still have to be continuously operated by a surgeon. Recently, however, a robotic catheter successfully navigated beating pig hearts on its own. read more

Vaccine for Colorectal Cancer may be Just Over the Horizon

A vaccine for colorectal cancer is all set for larger human trials to commence later this...
A vaccine for colorectal cancer is all set for larger human trials to commence later this year after success in a Phase I trial(Credit: lightsource/Depositphotos)

Positive early results from the first phase of human testing for a unique colorectal cancer vaccine are proving promising. A newly published study outlining the Phase I trial results suggests the vaccine is safe, and stimulates immune activation, paving the way for larger human trials. read more