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MitoQ May Be THE Antioxidant Breakthrough

Researchers have found that a commercially available supplement can improve dilation of a subjects’ arteries by...
Researchers have found that a commercially available supplement can improve dilation of a subjects’ arteries by 42 percent in response to increased blood flow(Credit:idcde/Depositphotos)

Much mystery surrounds the physiological processes by which humans age, but scientists are learning more all the time. With this knowledge come new possibilities around how we can not only slow them down, but possibly even reverse them. A new breakthrough at the University of Colorado is the latest advance in the area, demonstrating how a chemically altered nutritional supplement may well reverse aging of the blood vessels, in turn giving cardiovascular health a vital boost. read more

Think Twice Before Buying DNA Test Kits

from IBD:

5 Reasons You Should Avoid Take-Home DNA Tests

The holiday shopping season is just around the corner. And millions of Americans think they’ve found the perfect gift — DNA testing kits.

It’s easy to see why the kits from companies such as AncestryDNA, 23andMe, and MyHeritage are so popular. For less than $100, folks can discover their ancestry and uncover potentially dangerous genetic mutations. About 12 million Americans have bought these kits in recent years.

But DNA testing isn’t risk-free — far from it. The kits jeopardize people’s privacy, physical health, and financial well-being. There are five key reasons Americans should think twice before buying a DNA testing kit. read more

Bioengineered Spinal Discs Show Real Promise

An illustration of a human spinal column, highlighting a deteriorated intervertebral disc
An illustration of a human spinal column, highlighting a deteriorated intervertebral disc(Credit:CLIPAREA/Depositphotos)

As the shock-absorbing cartilage discs between our vertebrae degenerate due to aging, accidents or overuse, severe back pain can result. While some scientists have developed purely synthetic replacement discs, a recent test on goats indicates that bioengineered discs may be a better way to go. read more

Is a Diabetes Cure Now a Reality?

The new technique cures diabetes in mice by bypassing the immune system that attacks beta cells
The new technique cures diabetes in mice by bypassing the immune system that attacks beta cells(Credit: JacobSt/Depositphotos)

According to the Center for Disease Control, 1.25 million people suffer from type 1 diabetes in the US alone. So far, it can only be managed with diet and regular doses of insulin, but scientists at UT Health San Antonio have invented a way of curing the disease in mice that may one day do the same for humans even with type 2 diabetes. read more

The Darker the Coffee, the Healthier

The longer a coffee is roasted, the higher its level of phenylindanes
The longer a coffee is roasted, the higher its level of phenylindanes(Credit: AlekseyPatsyuk/Depositphotos)

For years, scientists have suspected that drinking coffee helps lessen the chances of getting Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. A new study indicates that this may indeed be the case, and that the darker the roast, the better it works. read more

Gas Embolotherapy Starves Tumors

Blowing bubbles in the blood could kill cancer with both barrels

Researchers have found that gas embolotherapy (blowing bubbles in the blood) could fight cancer in two...
Researchers have found that gas embolotherapy (blowing bubbles in the blood) could fight cancer in two ways(Credit: delfoto/Depositphotos)

Cancer can be a tricky foe, so the best way to fight it might not be with a direct attack, but to cut off its supply lines. One such method, known as gas embolotherapy, involves creating tiny bubbles in the tumor blood vessels, which block the blood supply and starve the cancer out. Now, researchers from China and France have found that the technique could also deal a second blow as a drug delivery system. read more

A Cancer-Killing Virus

Nobel-winning technology reveals cancer-killing virus locking onto target like a “key in a lock”

Professor Mihnea Bostina from the University of Otago was part of a research team imaging the...
Professor Mihnea Bostina from the University of Otago was part of a research team imaging the Seneca Valley Virus(Credit: University of Otago)

Last year, a cutting edge scientific imaging technology called cryo-electron microscopy earned a Nobel Prize for chemistry, lauded by the committee as ushering in a “revolution in biochemistry.” The technique allows scientists to visualize biomolecules in their natural state for the first time ever, and one year on is already opening up some exciting possibilities. Now, scientists have used it to image a high-potential cancer-killing virus in unprecedented detail, allowing them to now ponder how it might be genetically modified to better do the job. read more

Too Much Sleep Just as Bad as Too Little

Between seven and eight hours of sleep is the ideal duration for optimal cognitive performance according...
Between seven and eight hours of sleep is the ideal duration for optimal cognitive performance according to a new study(Credit: belchonock/Depositphotos)

The first results from the world’s largest sleep study have been published, concluding that between seven and eight hours of sleep is the ideal range for optimal cognitive performance. The study convincingly revealed that too much sleep interestingly correlated with similar cognitive deficits associated with too little sleep. read more

New Use for Ethanol – Kill Cancer

Ethanol - good to fuel your car, and now potentially kill tumors
Ethanol – good to fuel your car, and now potentially kill tumors(Credit: erierika/Depositphotos)

Scientists have known for some time that ethanol can kill cancer cells, but several limitations held it back from becoming a broadly used treatment. A team at Duke University has recently developed a new type of ethanol solution that can be injected directly into a variety of tumors to potentially offer a new, safe, and cheap form of cancer treatment. read more

Prolonged Space Travel may Damage the GI Tract

Cosmic radiation could adversely affect the digestive tracts of astronauts on a future manned mission to...
Cosmic radiation could adversely affect the digestive tracts of astronauts on a future manned mission to Mars(Credit: NASA)

In more bad news for future voyagers to Mars, a team of scientists at the Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC) has found the kind of Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR) that astronauts will encounter on long space voyages can cause heavy damage to their gastrointestinal (GI) tract. read more