Ring of Death

A ring of ground-to-air missile launchers could be deployed around London to protect Olympic venues, the Ministry of Defense confirmed yesterday.

 Six sites, including two residential complexes, are being tested as launch pads for missile systems capable of thwarting any airborne terror attack.

Starstreak and Rapier missile systems – which have a range of around 4 miles – would be deployed as a “last resort” to shoot down any low flying aircraft intending a 9/11 style suicide mission at one of the Olympic venues.

Defense sources claim radar would identify rogue aircraft and the missiles would be deployed long before they reached built up areas.

But experts have claimed that the systems are useless in poor weather as they rely on the operator being able to see the target.

Nick Brown, editor in chief of IHS Jane’s International Defense Review said, “The system’s weakness is that the missiles are laser-guided, steered onto their target by the soldier keeping his sight on an aircraft. So if the soldier can’t see an aircraft, they can’t hit it.

 As a result, the missiles can be badly affected by weather and would also not be able to engage targets ‘masked’ by buildings on their approach to the stadium.”

People living close to where the missiles are to be housed have also expressed concern about the dangers of using such weapons in urban areas.

The systems will be tested in the coming days as part of a major military exercise organized to check Olympic security preparations, although no test missiles will be fired.

Today members of the armed forces visited Bow Quarter in preparation for tomorrow’s exercise. Photographs taken by residents appear to show soldiers carrying large boxes.

A spokesman for the Ministry of Defense said they would be setting up equipment but would not be installing missiles, which are still at the “proposal stage”.

The six sites identified as potential locations for missile launchers are:

:: Bow Quarter, a large apartment complex close to the Olympic stadium.

:: Fred Wigg Tower, a 16 story residential tower block in Walthamstow, east London.

:: Blackheath Common, close to Greenwich where the Equestrian events will be held.

:: William Girling Reservoir, in Enfield, North East London.

:: Oxleas Wood, near Woolwich in East London

:: Netherhouse Farm in Epping Forest, North East London.

The missiles are intended to form part of a “layered” defense system, which will see 13,500 military personnel deployed to support the police for the duration of the games.

Typhoon aircraft will conduct low flying exercises over the capital and helicopters carrying snipers will also coduct practice operations.

General Sir Nick Parker, standing joint commander, said around 100 sites had initially been considered for missile launchers, but that had eventually been narrowed down to six.

He said the aim was to provide an “effective layered plan that provides a proper deterrent” adding that they could be used to defend venues against all manner of airborne attacks from the 9/11 style assault to a smaller “low and slow” attack from a single light aircraft.

He added: “There are two locations where we are going to place missiles on buildings because that is the very best place for them to go to do the jobs they are expected to do.

“This is what is going to be practiced over the next 10 days. We need to see that we can integrate them and they are really in the right place. Once we have done that we can make a final decision and make a final recommendation.”

He added: “I do understand that this is unusual and that people will be concerned. For the greater good it is prudent for us to provide this sort of air security plan. It would be sensible to be prepared for the worst.”

He added that the final decision on whether to fire the weapon systems would be taken at the “very highest political level”.

Defense Secretary Philip Hammond said: “Support for the Olympic Games will be an important task for defense in 2012 and this exercise is about pushing our people and our systems to the limit to ensure that we are ready for the challenge.

“The majority of this exercise will be played out in full view of the public and I hope that it will have a secondary effect of reassuring the British people that everything possible is being done to ensure this will be a safe and secure Olympic and Paralympic Games.”

Metropolitan Police Assistant Commissioner Chris Allison, the National Olympic Security Coordinator, said: “The Olympic Games are unusual so there will be a number of things we are doing which are unusual because the Olympic Games are coming. This is about trying to put in place a proportionate, necessary and sensible plan.

“The purpose of the exercise is to test whether they will work or not and then to make recommendations to the ministers because obviously, it has to have final approval from the ministers and not ourselves.”

Attribution: Mail Online

This Just In…Lenin Murdered!

The founder of Russian communism Vladamir Lenin died after being poisoned by his political successor Joseph Stalin, according to a sensational new theory.

Russian historian Lev Lurie, believes that while Lenin was already in poor health having suffered several strokes, Stalin may have finished him off after a bitter feud.

Lenin, who had initially supported Stalin’s rise to power, later began aligning himself with Leon Trotsky.

In notes dictated before his death, Lenin criticizes Stalin’s rude manners and ambitious nature.

He even suggested that Stalin should be removed from his position of General Secretary of the Communist Party.

Poisoning would later become Stalin’s preferred method for dealing with his enemies, Lurie points out.

He added: ‘The funny thing is that the brain of Lenin still is preserved in Moscow, so we can investigate.’

Popular theory maintains that Lenin died from the sexually-transmitted disease syphilis.

His embalmed body still lies on public display in a Red Square mausoleum almost 20 years after the collapse of the communist state he helped bring to life.

Mr Lurie and UCLA neurologist Dr. Harry Vinters reviewed Lenin’s records for an annual conference at the University of Maryland School of Medicine on famous people’s deaths.

Dr Vinters put forward a separate theory, maintaining that stress or a family medical history could have accounted for Lenin’s death

Prior to his death, the 53-year-old Soviet leader’s health had been growing worse over time.

In 1921, he forgot the words of a major speech and he had to learn to speak again and write with his left hand after one stroke.

A subsequent major stroke later left him paralyzed on one side and unable to speak.

An autopsy found blood vessels in his brain were extremely hardened, results that have been difficult to understand, said Dr. Philip Mackowiak, who organizes the yearly event.

‘Number one, he’s so young and number two, he has none of the important risk factors,’ Mackowiak said.

Lenin didn’t smoke – he never let smokers near him. He also didn’t have diabetes, wasn’t overweight and the autopsy didn’t find any evidence of high blood pressure, Mackowiak said.

There was ‘considerable suspicion’ among Russians at the time of Lenin’s death that syphilis was to blame, Mackowiak said.

However, family history appears to have worked more against Lenin, Vinters said.

Lenin’s embalmed body still lies on public display in a Red Square mausoleum almost 20 years after the collapse of the communist state he helped bring to life.

Lenin was treated for syphilis using the primitive medications available at the time, and while the sexually transmitted disease can cause strokes, there is no evidence from his symptoms or the autopsy that was the case with Lenin, Vinters said.

The Soviet leader’s father also died at 54 and both may have been predisposed to hardening of the arteries.

Stress also is a risk factor for strokes, and there’s no question the communist revolutionary was under plenty of that, the neurologist said.

‘People were always trying to assassinate him, for example.’ Dr Vinters said.

Dr Vinters, who reviewed autopsy records and the leader’s clinical history, said toxicology tests that might have revealed poisoning were not conducted during the autopsy.

Reports from the time also show Lenin was active and talking a few hours before his death.

‘And then he experienced a series of really, really bad convulsions which is quite unusual for someone who has a stroke,’ Vinters said.

The conference is held yearly at the school, where researchers in the past have re-examined the diagnoses of figures including King Tut, Christopher Columbus, Simon Bolivar and Abraham Lincoln.

Attribution: Mail Online

Forward Ho!

By: The Common Constitutionalist

Yes, the new Obama campaign slogan, “Forward”. It’s new, it’s innovative, it’s hip. Or is it? It appears quite similar to the MSNBC slogan “Lean Forward”. Funny coincidence, isn’t it.

It evokes movement in a positive direction. Don’t go back. Push on to better times ahead. One has to move”Forward” to make progress. Could that be where the term “Progressive” came from?  Absolutely! The early progressives knew we had to move forward. Cast off the shackles of that stifling old Constitution.

The slogan “Forward” is new and innovative, if you don’t know history. For those who do know their history, the slogan “Forward” is even more foreboding than that of “Progress”.

Wikipedia: The name Forward carries a special meaning in socialist political terminology. It has been frequently used as a name for socialist, communist and other leftwing newspapers and publications. For example, Vpered (Russian language for ‘Forward’) was the name of the publication that Lenin started after having resigned from the Iskra editorial board in 1905 after a clash with Georgi Plekhanov and the Mensheviks.

Now it’s time for some irony, travelling back in time to find the origins of the slogan, “Forward”.

Since a picture is worth a thousand words (or so they say), we’ll see what history has to offer.

Lenin, Forward for the Motherland, for our victory!

Under the leadership of the great Stalin - forward to Communism!

Young builders of communism! Forward, to the new successes in work and study!

Mao, Strike the battle drum of the Great Leap Forward ever louder

Sing revolutionary war songs with fervor, and move forward in victory.

Notice A common theme, maybe a word that stands out?