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A Living Constitution Provides No Stability

by: the Common Constitutionalist

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I’ve written a lot regarding the Constitution over the years – although not usually two days in row. Most times the topic boils down to a choice between the stability of originalism or the chaos of the co-called “living document.” This has been a great debate since the dawn of the progressive era.

In 2006 Elliott Mincberg, the vice president of the ultra lefty group “People for the American Way” said: “It was the framers intent that the Constitution would adapt to changing circumstances.” In other words, a living Constitution.

Most would be surprised that, in my opinion, the founders would agree with Mr. Mincberg – although I guarantee they would not agree with his method of change.

That same year Todd Gaziono of the Heritage Foundation said: “Original intent is the only legitimate means of interpretation under our written Constitution and all other philosophies are illegitimate.” Mr. Gaziono is also correct.

Okay, both can’t be correct. Obviously the “living Constitution” crowd is wrong because, as we all know, the left has no desire to amend the Constitution. They instead see fit to usurp the Constitution by means of laws, court precedents and presidential decrees.  read more

Treat the Constitution Like the NFL Rulebook

by: the Common Constitutionalist

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What does it mean when we right-wingers describe ourselves as conservatives? What is it that we are trying so hard to save, preserve or prevent the loss of – which is what conserve means. Those on the left would say we wish to conserve the days of slavery and Jim Crow – or maybe the white-old days of the 1950s before the Civil Rights movement.

Despite the fact that all those bad times were born of the left in this country, we conservatives wish to reestablish and conserve America’s original set of governing rules.

Our nation was founded on a set of ideals – the Declaration of Independence, and rules – the Constitution. Yet Americans today seem only to care about some rules, but not others. We demand absolute adherence to some rule books, while all but ignoring others.

As most of my readers know, I’m a huge fan of the NFL – particularly the New England Patriots, but also just a lover of everything pro-football. (Don’t hate me just because your team isn’t as good).

On many occasions, I’ve witnessed that we, at least we football fans, will have a nationwide collective meltdown, if say a player commits a penalty and gets away with it late in the fourth quarter of a close game. Fans take to Twitter, Instagram and Facebook to vent their spleens over a flagrant violation that goes unpunished and may cost their team the game. read more

Surviving After All Else Dies

The tardigrade shall inherit the Earth, according to a new study from Oxford and Harvard
The tardigrade shall inherit the Earth, according to a new study from Oxford and Harvard(Credit: rukanoga/Depositphotos)

In about 5 billion years’ time, our Sun will use up its reserves of hydrogen and begin to cool down and expand, cooking the Earth in a miasma of heat and radiation. Given our current trajectory, humans will probably be long gone by then anyway, but at least one lifeform will likely still be plodding along: the utterly unkillable tardigrade. According to a new study from Harvard and Oxford, it’ll take nothing short of the death of the Sun to finally do the species in – which bodes well for the resilience of life as a whole. read more

WND Exclusive – George Soros makes Alinsky look reasonable

There are things throughout history that one can point to and say, “That changed everything.” Things like electricity, indoor plumbing and gunpowder.

Then there are others we can point to as simply upgrades or improvements to the original design. Things like fuel injection, the self-contained rifle cartridge or “Hot Shots! Part Deux.”

Barack Obama improved on Saul Alinsky’s teaching of community agitating – expanding it from a local to a national movement. read more

WND Exclusive – A DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCY

It was May of 1775, and the second Continental Congress met for the first time. Growing weary of King George III’s utter lack of attention toward the petition to redress grievances sent by the first Continental Congress, the colonists decided to act.

In June of that year the Congress developed a currency separate of the crown. They also established the first Continental Army, calling themselves the “United Colonies.”

Getting word of the colonies’ seditious behavior, the king declared that the American colonists were “engaged in open and avowed rebellion.” The British Parliament passed the “American Prohibitory Act” later that year, which instituted a naval blockade of all American ports and halted the colonies’ trade with the world and among each other. read more

Presidential Passings Marked by Divine Providence

by: the Common Constitutionalist

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There were five Founding Fathers who became president. Some would say that no – in fact there were six. What about John Quincy Adams? Was he not a founder? No – no he wasn’t. He was the son of second President John Adams, but was only a child of the Revolution.

The five, in order, where of course George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison and James Monroe.

It was Divine Providence that brought all these great men together at this exact place and this exact time in history. It was through acts of Divine Providence that the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution were crafted and signed. It was Divine Providence that assisted in the founding of our nation. And it was Divine Providence that God put his final stamp on the founding of the United States, with the passing of three of the five Founder Presidents on the day of America’s declared Independence. And, save for just six days, it could have been four. Actually, I suppose, it wouldn’t be a stretch to really say it was four. read more

Raising a Revolutionary Warship

More than two decades after it was discovered at the bottom of Lake Champlain, a Revolutionary War gunboat may see the light of day under a museum plan to raise and preserve the vessel.

The Spitfire, a 54-foot boat that’s part of a fleet built by Benedict Arnold before he turned traitor, sank a day after the 1776 Battle of Valcour Island, helping delay a British advance down the lake.

The Spitfire’s sinking made it possible for the 1777 American victory at the Battle of Saratoga – a key moment in the American Revolution.

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This image from a remote camera provided by the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum shows a cannon, believed to be from the Revolutionary War gunboat "Spitfire", on the bottom of Vermont's Lake Champlain. The Vermont museum wants to raise the Revolutionary War gunboat where it has rested since shortly after the 1776 Battle of Valcour Island, preserve it and then display it in a yet-to-be built New York museum. (Ernie Haas/Lake Champlain Maritime Museum via AP)

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WND Exclusive – Are you, too, a ‘Declarationist’?

1864 Two Cent Coin

Memorial Day has come and gone. I hope you all sought out the family of one of our fallen heroes or at least said a prayer on their behalf.

Now we’re into summer, though not technically, and America’s next great celebration is on the horizon – that of our nation’s independence.

We in America, and certainly us political wonks, write and speak constantly of the United States Constitution. We may do so often that it can sometimes seem tiresome to listen to – even for other fans of the Constitution. Not that I hear this from my friends and family or anything. read more

Dinosaur Tooth Could Change American History

A chance discovery of a single tooth in Mississippi provides the first evidence of an animal closely related to Triceratops in eastern North America.

Until now, most experts believed North America was split by a vast sea.

However, this rare 68 to 66 million-year-old tooth suggests there was a bridge between the two sides.

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Until now, experts believed North America was split by a sea but this rare 68 to 66 million-year-old tooth (pictured), found in Mississippi suggests there was a bridge between the two sides

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