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Discriminating Antibiotics

Researchers at Penn State have developed an antibiotic that targets a specific species of bad bacteria,...
Researchers at Penn State have developed an antibiotic that targets a specific species of bad bacteria, without harming the good ones in your gut(Credit: phodopus/Depositphotos)

Antibiotics are effective at killing bacteria (for now, at least), but they aren’t very picky, indiscriminately wiping out both good and bad bacteria. This can upset the fragile balance of your microbiome, which is increasingly being linked to general health and wellbeing. Now, researchers at Penn State have developed a new approach to make a drug that can single out a specific, opportunistic bacteria known as C. difficile. read more

New Drug Delivery for Brain Cancer

An artist's rendition of MIT's new nanoparticles, which can carry two forms of drug to combat...
An artist’s rendition of MIT’s new nanoparticles, which can carry two forms of drug to combat brain cancer(Credit: Stephen Morton)

Glioblastoma is one of the most deadly forms of cancer. Affecting the brain, those unlucky enough to receive a diagnosis don’t have many treatment options – and usually a median life expectancy of just over a year. Now, researchers at MIT have developed nanoparticles that could provide hope, crossing the blood-brain barrier and delivering two types of drugs to fight tumors. read more

Enzymes Cause Cancer to Die of Old Age

Cancer hijacks a natural anti-aging enzyme to make itself immortal, and now scientists have found a...
Cancer hijacks a natural anti-aging enzyme to make itself immortal, and now scientists have found a way to counteract that process(Credit: Sashkin7/Depositphotos)

At the cellular level, aging and cancer are two sides of the same coin. The mechanism that limits a cell’s lifespan can be slowed down, but that can turn them cancerous, as they divide unchecked.

Now, scientists at EPFL have found a way to manipulate that mechanism to effectively turn off cancer’s immortality, letting it die slowly and naturally. read more

Oral Insulin Moving to Final Stages of Testing

Insulin in a pill is one step closer to reality as clinical trials progress
Insulin in a pill is one step closer to reality as clinical trials progress(Credit: SergIllin/Depositphotos)

For decades researchers have worked to find a way to orally administer insulin effectively to patients with diabetes. Now this game-changing treatment is one step closer to reality, with pharmaceutical company Oramed embarking on a final Phase 2b human clinical trial to prove the efficacy of its oral insulin before moving to the final stages of trials and registrations that could bring the treatment to market within a few short years. read more

Handheld Skin Printer

From left to right, associate professor Axel Guenther, Navid Hakimi and Richard Cheng with the skin...
From left to right, associate professor Axel Guenther, Navid Hakimi and Richard Cheng with the skin printer(Credit: Liz Do)

Four years ago, we heard how researchers had created a microwave-oven-sized 3D printer that could produce sheets of skin for treating burns. Now, some of the same scientists have developed a handheld device that prints skin directly onto deep wounds. read more

No Stay of Execution for Alfie

by: Brent Smith at the Common Constitutionalist

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The case of little Alfie Evans is a tragic one. At 23 months old, this healthy boy developed a rare neurodegenerative disorder that left him in a semi-vegetative state. That’s strike one against the poor little tike.

Strike two is that he and his parents reside in England, the poster nation for socialized medicine. And strike three is that, given enough time, every nation with socialized medicine will eventually be forced into the development of death panels.

In England the defacto “death panels” is the British court system. The courts decide who will live and who will die. The courts have decided the latter of the two fates for Alfie. They have condemned him to death with no stay of execution, no pardon and possibility of parole.

This is funny (not ha, ha funny), considering Great Britain has long ago rejected the death penalty for the worst criminals and terrorists among them, but seem to have little problem sending a two year old to death row. read more

A Cancer Kill Switch

Researchers at Northwestern University have developed a way to trigger an ancient cancer "kill switch" hidden...
Researchers at Northwestern University have developed a way to trigger an ancient cancer “kill switch” hidden in our genes(Credit: ralwel/Depositphotos)

Cancer is one of our most persistent enemies, but while we now have advanced immune systems to fight the good fight, how did early multicellular life manage to stave it off? A genetic “kill switch” seems to have been the original weapon of choice, and now researchers at Northwestern University believe they’ve discovered a way to trigger that mechanism. This knowledge could potentially pave the way to a therapy where cancer cells commit suicide, which would be impossible for cancer cells to adapt a resistance to. read more

People are Avoiding Doctors due to ObamaCare

from the Blaze:

Obamacare is now so terrible, people aren’t going to their doctors — even when sick

When the Affordable Care Act was passed in 2010, its supporters celebrated the legislation, calling it a landmark bill that would make Americans healthier and lower health care costs for families. Eight years later, it’s clearer than ever the ACA’s “Obamacare” exchanges have done quite the opposite. Not only are health care costs skyrocketing, the health insurance provided by Obamacare is so expensive for people to use that millions more Americans are now choosing not to go to the doctor — even when they’re sick or injured. read more

Harvard Breaking Down Bacterial Walls

In this artist's rendition of a bacterium, the blue dots represent the cell wall-building protein RodA...
In this artist’s rendition of a bacterium, the blue dots represent the cell wall-building protein RodA – and disrupting that protein’s function could be key to a new class of antibiotic(Credit: Harvard Medical School)

Bacteria can be hardy little creatures, thanks mostly to their strong cell walls that can protect them against drugs, viruses and other dangers. Finding ways to disarm these defenses is a key component of antibiotics, and now researchers at Harvard Medical School have identified a structural weakness that seems to be built into a range of bacterial species, potentially paving the way for a new class of widely-effective antibacterial drugs. read more

You Must Comply…With Your Dentist

from Michelle Malkin at Townhall:

The Snitches in Your Kids’ Dental Office

How sharper than a serpent’s tooth to have a despotic pediatric dentist.

Parents who decide, for whatever reason, that they don’t like their children’s oral care provider should be forewarned. Empowered by government “mandatory reporter” laws, dental offices are now using their authority to threaten families with child abuse charges if they don’t comply with the cavity police.

Mom Trey Hoyumpa shared a letter last week on Facebook from a dental office called Smiles 4 Keeps in Bartonsville, Pennsylvania. It informed her that if she did not make a dental appointment for “regular professional cleanings” for her child, she could be charged with “dental neglect.”
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