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A Decade of Scientific Breakthroughs

Kepler's efforts in exoplanet hunting was one of the biggest scientific achievements of the decade
Kepler’s efforts in exoplanet hunting was one of the biggest scientific achievements of the decade
NASA/Wendy Stenzel

As we stare down the barrel of the futuristic-sounding year 2020, it’s a time for reflection on the past decade. The world has seen some pretty major scientific achievements in the last 10 years, as discoveries and developments decades in the making were finally realized. New Atlas rounds up five of the most ground-breaking, history-making milestones of the 2010s. read more

Diagnostic Contact Lens

One day, contact lenses could do much more than just correct our vision
One day, contact lenses could do much more than just correct our vision

The notion of wearing lenses over our eyes to correct our vision dates back hundreds of years, with some even crediting Leonardo da Vinci as one of the first proponents of the idea (though that remains somewhat controversial). Material science and our understanding of the human eye have come a long way since, while their purpose has remained largely the same. In the age of wearable computers, however, scientists in the laboratories of DARPA, Google, and universities around the world see contact lenses not just as tools to improve our vision, but as opportunities to augment the human experience. But how? And why? read more

Made to Order 3D Printed Prosthetics

The IMPACT hand will be available in a number of color choices
The IMPACT hand will be available in a number of color choices
Iterate UK/Ambionics

Amputees wishing to get a powered prosthetic hand – also known as a bionic hand – typically have to wait quite a while for the thing to be manufactured. Soon, however, they should be able to order a custom bionic hand that’s 3D-printed within 10 hours. read more

A Single Injection for Peanut Allergy?

Medical scientists at Stanford University have set out to explore the potential of a drug called etokimab in treating peanut allergies
Medical scientists at Stanford University have set out to explore the potential of a drug called etokimab in treating peanut allergies

The long pursuit of a treatment for peanut allergy is littered with false dawns, but there are also some promising possibilities on the horizon, including one currently on the cusp of FDA approval. Another has just emerged via a promising early trial at Stanford University, where scientists found a single injection of an antibody treatment enabled those with severe allergies to stomach peanuts for some time. read more

Our Favorite Sport Suffers as America Wussifies

from the American Spectator:

Football Is Good for Kids, Propaganda Is Not

Keep those Friday Night Lights on, unless you want America’s youth to grow up less healthy and more risk averse.

Joseph Sohm/Shutterstock.com

Americans watch more NFL this season after several years of ratings decline. While couches and seats fill, fields go empty. For the first time in 30 years, high school sports witnessed a participation drop last year, with football’s loss of 31,000 athletes primarily fueling the decline. Youth football more glaringly experiences a participation freefall. read more

Podcast – More College Censorship – Trangendering is Child Abuse

by: Brent Smith

More College Censorship
Censorship is alive and well on college campuses. So says the College fix, and anyone with eyes can see they’re right.

This time a conservative group had their Halloween display taken down after only being up for several hours last week. Of course no one knows anything about, but the Young Americans for Freedom club vows to get to the bottom of it.

By the way – they’re display were gravestones with the words “Socialism Kills” on them.

Trangendering is Child Abuse
Most have heard of the tragic story of the 7 year old Texas boy whose mother wants to change into a girl. And worse is a jury, in Texas no less, said that would fine.

Luckily a Judge overturned the jury and put a stay on the case, giving rights back to both parents. The father objects. What a Puritan – right.

Simply put, this mother should be locked up for child abuse. read more

Amazing Prosthetic Advances

Spinal cord injury patient Buz Chmielewsk with Johns Hopkins University researcher Matt Fifer
Spinal cord injury patient Buz Chmielewsk with Johns Hopkins University researcher Matt Fifer
Johns Hopkins APL

Brain-connected machines that capture and translate electrical signals are showing great promise across a number of areas, but one with massive potential is the world of prosthetics. Scientists exploring these possibilities at Johns Hopkins University are now reporting a big breakthrough, demonstrating a system that enables a quadriplegic to control two prosthetics arms at once using only his thoughts, and also feel a sense of touch coming back the other way. read more

Walk Slow – Age Fast

A study suggests slow gait at the age of 45 may be a sign of accelerated aging
A study suggests slow gait at the age of 45 may be a sign of accelerated aging

Gait speed, or the pace at which a person walks, has long been effectively used as a biomarker for neurological and physiological health in older subjects. A fascinating new study is for the first time suggesting that gait speed may also be an effective measure of biological aging for someone in their 40s. read more

Indestructible Tardigrade – the Key to Radiation Shielding

Rendering of a tardigrade, considered the toughest animal on Earth
Rendering of a tardigrade, considered the toughest animal on Earth

It takes something truly extraordinary, like maybe the death of the Sun, to kill the near-indestructible invertebrate known as the tardigrade. Crash-landings on the Moon, a lack of oxygen and conditions in the darkest corners of the ocean don’t appear pose a threat to this critter’s livelihood. Scientists studying these so-called water bears have uncovered a neat trick they employ to endure inhospitable conditions, using a unique protein to generate protective clouds around their DNA. read more

What to do About the National Debt

Brian Riedl for Prager University discusses the national debt – the fact that every year, like clockwork, it continues to grow.

No matter who is in the White House or who controls Congress and the Senate doesn’t seem to matter at all. Deficit spending continues to grow and the national debt continues to balloon.

And no one seems to care. read more