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Lamborghini Smartphone

It’s known for creating the ultimate in luxury sports cars.

Now, Tonino Lamborghini has released a luxury Android smartphone to match its vehicles – the £1,900 ($2,450) Alpha – One.

The phone boasts Italian handmade black leather and a frame made from the same ‘stronger than titanium liquid metal’ used to build its supercars.

The Alpha – One smartphone also comes with an accompanying custom black leather case, but critics claim the device’s specs do not match its price tag.

Despite Lamborghini claiming its latest phone features ‘the most luxurious technology’, the device has similar specifications to high-end smartphones that cost less than a third of the price.

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Tonino Lamborghini has released a £1,900 ($2,450) luxury Android phone (pictured) made with Italian handmade black leather and frame made of the 'liquid metal' used in its supercars

Ingenious Under-Bridge Shelter

The shelter was created by Spanish self-taught designer Fernando Abellanas
The shelter was created by Spanish self-taught designer Fernando Abellanas (Credit: Jose Manuel Pedrajas)

If trolls really did live under bridges, they could do a lot worse than commission Spaniard Fernando Abellanas to build them a new home. The self-taught designer recently installed a novel shelter under an anonymous traffic bridge in Valencia that includes shelving, seating, and even a sleeping space. read more

First Viable Hologram Table

Euclideon's hologram table: early installations are likely to be used primarily at a municipal level for ...
Euclideon’s hologram table: early installations are likely to be used primarily at a municipal level for town planning and area response purposes (Credit: Euclideon)

Australian company Euclideon has built a working prototype of what it calls the world’s first true multi-user hologram table. Up to four people can walk around a holographic image and interact with it wearing only a small set of glasses – a far cry from bulky AR headgear. It’s set to go on sale in 2018. read more

Toyota to Patent See-Thru Car Door Pillars

The days of having to crane your neck around your car’s pillars to see at a junction could soon be a thing of the past, if a new patent is to be believed.

Toyota has filed a patent for a ‘cloaking’ device, which would allow drivers to see straight through their car and get a 360 degree view of the road.

It is unclear when, or if, Toyota plans to implement the system in its cars.

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Toyota's patent describes a 'cloaking device' that would be used on the A-pillars on either side of the windshield

THE PATENT 

The patent describes a ‘cloaking device’ that would be used on the A-pillars on either side of the windshield.

Mirrors would be strategically placed around the car to bend visible light around an object, allowing the driver to see through it.

The patent states: ‘Light from an object on an object-side of the cloaking device is directed around an article within the cloaking region and forms an image on an image-side of the cloaking device such the article appears transparent to an observer.’ 

Toyota was granted the patent, titled ‘Apparatuses and methods for making an object appear transparent’ by the United States Patent and Trademark Office this week.

The patent describes a ‘cloaking device’ that would be used on the A-pillars on either side of the windshield.

The device is made up of mirrors, strategically placed to bend visible light around an object, allowing the driver to see through it.

The patent states: ‘Light from an object on an object-side of the cloaking device is directed around an article within the cloaking region and forms an image on an image-side of the cloaking device such the article appears transparent to an observer.’

Weapon Wednesday – Patriot Missile System Gets an Upgrade

Lockheed Martin’s radar technology demonstrator is designed to operate within the US Army Integrated Air & ...
Lockheed Martin’s radar technology demonstrator is  designed to operate within the US Army Integrated Air & Missile Defense (IAMD) framework (Credit: Lockheed Martin)

The radar at the heart of US Army’s Patriot missile system is getting a bit long in the tooth, so Lockheed Martin has announced the debut of its next-generation air and missile defense radar demonstrator. The 360⁰ capable Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) Radar for Engagement and Surveillance (ARES) will be unveiled to the public at the 2017 Space & Missile Defense Symposium in Huntsville, Alabama. read more

An Autonomous Helicopter Air Taxi

German automobile firm Daimler and other investors have has invested more than $29 million dollars (25 million euro) in aviation start-up Volocopter.

Volocopter plans to use the money to invest in further developing its electrically powered, autonomous Vertical Take-Off and Landing (VTOL) aircraft and ‘conquer’ the market for flying air taxis.

Volocopter’s ‘Volocopter 2X’ is a fully electric VTOL with 18 quiet rotors and a maximum airspeed of 100 kilometers (62 miles) per hour – and it can transport two passengers without a pilot.

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Volocopter announced that in the fourth quarter of 2017, it will work with Dubai's Road and Transport Authority (RTA) to conduct tests of its vehicle as an autonomous air taxi. The trial operations and certification program is expected to continue for five years

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First Test of Hyperloop One

Phase 2 of testing has seen the XP-1 put through its paces at Hyperloop One's 500-meter ...
Phase 2 of testing has seen the XP-1 put through its paces at Hyperloop One’s 500-meter (1,600 ft) tube in the Nevada desert

A few weeks back, Hyperloop One revealed a prototype of a pod that it hopes will eventually ferry passengers through near-vacuum tubes at around the speed of sound. Today, the company has announced the first successful tests of this futuristic capsule, in which it levitated above a test track en route to speeds of more than 300 km/h. read more

Weapon Wednesday – USS Gerald R. Ford Shows Off Two New Systems

An F/A-18F Super Hornet assigned to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 flies over USS ...
 An F/A-18F Super Hornet assigned to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 flies over USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) (Credit: US Navy/Erik Hildebrandt)

The USS Gerald R Ford scored a double first less than a week after commissioning, as the nuclear-powered supercarrier launched and recovered a fighter plane for the first time using an electromagnetic catapult. On July 28, an F/A-18F Super Hornet piloted by Commander Jamie Struck was launched from the flight deck by the ElectroMAgnetic Launch System (EMALS) shortly after arrival, when it made the first arrested landing with the Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) system. read more

My PC Isn’t Fast – So What

You may have heard of something called Moore’s Law with regards to computing power. The most simplistic way to describe this is that computing power doubles roughly every year to year and a half. This prediction has pretty much held up fairly well over the last thirty years. Now, with computing power doubling over every year and a half over thirty years means that today’s computers are roughly a million times faster than the first personal computers.

This may seem like a great thing to have a PC that is extremely fast but if you look a bit more closely at how the average PC is used, much of this performance is wasted as the system sits idle for more than 95% of the time. With the processor sitting idle, it isn’t generally necessary for a consumer to buy the most powerful system out there. Instead, it is generally better to buy a more affordable option that will give you roughly the same overall level of experience in the software you will be running. After all, you don’t need a massive eight core processor if your PC is going to be used just to play minesweeper. This article takes a look at how the average PC is used and then tries to point buyers to what would best suit their computing needs. read more

Does TV Resolution Matter

To Know About 720p and 1080p

Video Resolution Chart - 480i to 1080p

Video Resolution Chart – 480i to 1080p. mage via Wikimedia Commons – Public Domain

How 720p and 1080p Are Similar and Different

Although 4K gets all the buzz these days as the ultimate high-resolution video format available, 720p and 1080p are actually both high definition video display formats. In addition, the other characteristic 1080p and 720p share in common are that they are progressive display formats (that is where the “p” comes from). However, this is where the similarity between 720p and 1080p ends.

  • 720p is 1,280 pixels displayed across the screen horizontally and 720 pixels down the screen vertically. This arrangement yields 720 horizontal lines on the screen, which are, in turn, displayed progressively, or each line displayed following another.
  • 1080p represents 1,920 pixels displayed across the screen horizontally and 1,080 pixels down the screen vertically. This arrangement yields 1,080 horizontal lines on the screen, which are, in turn, displayed progressively, or each line of pixels displayed following another. In other words, all lines are displayed progressively, providing a very detailed high definition video image.

The main difference between 720p and 1080p lies in the number of pixels that make up a 720p image and 1080p image. For 720p the number of pixels that make up the image is about 1 million (equivalent to 1 megapixel in a digital still camera) and about 2 million pixels for 1080p.

This means that a 1080p image has the potential to display a lot more detail than a 720p image.

However, how does this all translate to what you actually see on a TV screen? Shouldn’t it be easy to see the difference between a 720p and 1080p TV? Not necessarily.

Besides pixel density of 1080p vs 720p, there are also the factors of screen size and seating distance from the screen to take into consideration.

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