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Even the EPA Admits Ethanol is no Good

from IBD:

EPA Says Ethanol Damages The Environment — Isn’t It Time To Kill The Program?

Amid all the media hoo-ha over President Trump’s latest tweets, tariffs and the Russia investigation, you might have missed a significant report — the Environmental Protection Agency says ethanol made from corn and soybeans and added to our gasoline has become an environmental disaster. So why do we continue to make it?

The devastating report — based on, yes, actual “science” — shows that the forced addition of ethanol to the nation’s gasoline is making our air dirtier.

The irony, of course, is that ethanol’s entire rationale is that it would make our air cleaner. read more

What’s Next for San Francisco to Ban?

from the American Spectator:

San Francisco: The City of Bans

At times, it’s impossible to guess which things progressives want to ban — and which ones they want to mandate and subsidize. Think of New York City’s approach to electric bicycles. My guess would have been that the city would subsidize those environmentally friendly modes of transportation like other liberal cities do, given how much cleaner they are than taxis and buses. But until last April, officials there had viewed them as unsafe and intrusive and even had confiscated e-bikes from those caught riding them on the city’s streets and sidewalks. read more

Baltic Sea Algae Bloom

NASA has revealed an incredible image of a gigantic ‘whirlpool’ of algae in the Baltic sea.

Every summer, phytoplankton spread across the northern basins of the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans, with blooms spanning hundreds and sometimes thousands of kilometers.

Blooms this summer off of Scandinavia seem to be particularly intense, NASA said.

Scroll down for video 

On July 18, 2018, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 acquired a natural-color image (above) of a swirling green phytoplankton bloom in the Gulf of Finland, a section of the Baltic Sea. Note how the phytoplankton trace the edges of a vortex; it is possible that this ocean eddy is pumping up nutrients from the depths. For scale, a ship is shown. The swirling bloom is at least 15 miles across, which means New York City¿s Manhattan Island could fit inside it with a little room to spare.

Much of Your Recycling goes Direct to the Landfill

from IBD:

Some Inconvenient Truths About Recycling

It has become an article of faith in the U.S. that recycling is a good thing. But evidence is piling up that recycling is a waste of time and money, and a bit of a fraud.

The New York Times recently reported that, unknown to most families who spend hours separating garbage into little recycling bins, much of the stuff ends up in a landfill anyway.

One big reason: China has essentially shut the door to U.S. recyclables. read more

Globe is Cooling – That’s Why We Call it Climate Change

from IBD:

Don’t Tell Anyone, But We Just Had Two Years Of Record-Breaking Global Cooling

NASA data show that global temperatures dropped sharply over the past two years. Not that you’d know it, since that wasn’t deemed news. Does that make NASA a global warming denier?

Writing in Real Clear Markets, Aaron Brown looked at the official NASA global temperature data and noticed something surprising. From February 2016 to February 2018, “global average temperatures dropped by 0.56 degrees Celsius.” That, he notes, is the biggest two-year drop in the past century. read more

The EPA is Only Useful When the Left Controls It

by: Brent Smith at the Common Constitutionalist

No Audio Version

Let me state for the record that there should be no federal Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards. If States wish to regulate themselves to death, let them.

Despite my misgivings that these types of federal regulations are unconstitutional, if CAFE Standards are to become law, they should, at the very least, have to be passed by Congress, where all laws must originate.

That being said, the last time Congress passed a law which included fuel efficiency standards was 2007 – more than a decade ago.

Congress first established CAFE standards in 1975. They set the average fuel economy of the new car fleet to 27.5 mpg by model year (MY) 1985. Then, under “conservative” George W. Bush, Congress passed and the president signed the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. Don’t you love the bogus names they give these egregious pieces of legislation?

Anyway, the new legislation raised the fuel economy standards of America’s cars, light trucks, and SUVs to a combined average of at least 35 miles per gallon by 2020—a 10 mpg increase over 2007 levels—and required standards to be met at maximum feasible levels through 2030. read more

Infinitely-Recyclable Plastics

A sample of the infinitely-recyclable polymer developed at Colorado State University
A sample of the infinitely-recyclable polymer developed at Colorado State University(Credit:Bill Cotton/Colorado State University)

As useful as it is, plastic isn’t the most environmentally-friendly material. Our constant use of the stuff has seen huge amounts of it lodged in Arctic sea ice, penetrating to the deepest parts of the ocean and even travelling up the food chain. read more

The White Streets of L.A.

from The American Spectator:

Yes, painting streets.

Having just recently extricated myself from the City of Angels after twenty-two years there, I can recite a litany of taxpayer abuses almost reflexively. Big American cities that have been run by liberals for decades never have a second thought about burdening their citizens, often for the most insane, feel-good, liberal reasons.

Very few things scream “nonsensical waste of time and money” like whichever boondoggle Climate Church orthodoxy is forcing upon the public at any given time. read more

Lobsters are the Key To Jellyfish Blooms

A deep sea image showing a Norway lobster munching on a jellyfish
A deep sea image showing a Norway lobster munching on a jellyfish(Credit: Heriot-Watt University)

Jellyfish blooms are regarded by some as an ecological menace, but they may sound the dinner gong for the commercially valuable Norway lobster. Recently, a team of scientists from Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh have photographed the tasty crustacean in the waters off western Norway chowing down on jellyfish carcasses, suggesting that they could form a major part of its diet.

The 25-cm (10-in) Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus), also known as the Dublin Bay prawn, langoustine, or scampi, is the most important commercial crustacean in Europe, responsible for revenues of £78 million (US$105 million) to Scotland alone. They’re remarkably abundant in the north-eastern Atlantic and parts of the Mediterranean, and they’re cheaper than the larger common lobster. Each year 60,000 tonnes of them are hauled in with half taken in British waters. read more