Not Close to Full Employment – But It’s Progress

from IBD:

Full Employment? Even With 313,000 New Jobs, We’re Not There Yet

The February gain in jobs — 313,000 — was impressive on a number of levels. But it also confirms something we’ve been saying for some time: We aren’t anywhere near full employment.

 If you’re looking for good news in the latest jobs numbers, it’s hard to know where to start.

First, 313,000 was 50,000 more than expected, and is the biggest monthly gain in jobs in a year and a half.

In fact, since the recession ended in June 2009, there have only been six months in which job gains beat this number — which doesn’t say much for President Obama’s economic performance. read more

Innovation Born of Necessity

by: Brent Smith at the Common Constitutionalist

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I am firmly against excessive tariffs. I’ve made that crystal clear on a number of occasions. Reasonable tariffs on imported goods are well… perfectly reasonable. At our founding, it was the source of federal government funding. Reasonable import tariffs (imposts) and duties covered the cost of operating the small federal government budget. It paid for the labor and clerical work of the importation and inspection process. As the feds were responsible for little else constitutionally, tariffs were an adequate funding system.

But these days, tariffs could not hope to cover the cost of operating the federal leviathan. They are now more a measure of protectionism worldwide. And I agree that on the world stage, America has allowed itself to be taken advantage of. Other nations expect America to charge minimal import tariffs and duties for the goods they export to us, but few reciprocate.

Nations like China do in fact take advantage of us. They expect us to treat them fairly, but often charge exorbitant tariffs on products we ship to them. And that’s assuming they accept our exports at all. In many cases, they simply do not. They don’t wish to compete with American imports on their own soil. For a long time, it has been rather one-sided.

And for just as long, the American government has put up with inequity, afraid to make waves. Enter President Trump. read more

Donald J “Smoot-Hawley” Trump – It’s Déjà Vu All Over Again

by: Brent Smith at the Common Constitutionalist

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Here we are again – our government doing what they do best – picking winners and losers. President Trump has done a lot of good things for this nation thus far, but protectionist tariffs aren’t one of them.

The first protectionist tariff, the “Dallas” tariff, was enacted in 1816. It happened again in 1824, in 1828, the infamous “Tariff of Abominations,” in 1832 to fix the problem in 1828 (which it didn’t), and in 1842, the “Black” tariff.

All these were passed to benefit the Northern States at the expense of the South, and all were major contributing factors in the run-up to the Civil War. No, the Civil War was not just about slavery.

And then there was the infamous “Smoot-Hawley” tariff of 1930. It was named after its authors, Utah Senator Reed Smoot and Oregon Congressman Willis Hawley. The purpose was to support U.S. farmers who had been ravaged by the Dust Bowl.

By the time 1930 rolled around, practically every legislator had added protections to Smoot-Hawley for their states’ industries. The bill ended up with proposed tariffs on 20,000 individual imported goods. Does this sound eerily familiar to anyone? It’s why bills are thousands of pages long – to attempt to hide such things.

This time, instead of agriculture, our government has chosen the American Aluminum and Steel industries to be the temporary winners. Yay! read more

How Long Can We Afford Runaway Healthcare Spending?

from the American Spectator:

More Than Half of Food Stamp Recipients Don’t Work


Report: 52 Percent of Non-Disabled Parents on Food Stamps Do Not Work

The debate surrounding food stamp recipients focuses on able-bodied adults without children, and a report released Thursday found that more than half of parents without disabilities who receive food stamps do not work.

The report, from the Foundation for Government Accountability (FGA), found that 52 percent of able-bodied parents on food stamps were not working, even though they had no disabilities precluding them from seeking employment. read more

Administration to Cut More Regulations

from the Washington Free Beacon:

Feds to Repeal 298 Tax Regulations

Steve Mnuchin

Treasury seeking to eliminate outdated regs dating back to 1941

The Treasury Department plans to eliminate nearly 300 outdated tax regulations, getting tax rules off the books that in some cases have not applied since the 1940s.

The department announced its proposal to eliminate unnecessary tax regulations this week, in compliance with two executive orders signed by President Donald Trump last year to reduce regulatory burdens and simplify the tax code. read more

What Happened to Sean “Penny Plan” Hannity

by: Brent Smith at the Common Constitutionalist

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This upsets me, but if we are to remain true to conservative ideals, we must be prepared to call those who appear to have abandoned them.

In early July, 2011, U.S. Representative for Florida’s 14th congressional district, Cornelius Harvey McGillicuddy (cool name), better known as Connie Mack IV, introduced a government spending plan called the Mack Penny Plan.

Mack served in Congress from 2004-2013.

More precisely, Mack Penny was a plan to cut government spending. Unlike virtually all things in government, his plan was quite simple. For every dollar of proposed spending, the plan would take away one penny of spending. So instead of the government spending that dollar, they would receive 99 cents to spend. See – simple.

In August of that year, FreedomWorks wrote that, “The Penny Plan would require Congress to cut just one penny out of each dollar it spends every year for six years. These gradual cuts over the next six years will balance the federal budget.”

If it were enacted it would have, “capped Overall Spending at 18 Percent of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Starting in Fiscal Year 2018, Reduce Overall Federal Spending by $7.5 trillion over the Next Ten Years, Would Balance the Federal Budget by 2019 and End Washington’s Unprecedented Spending Spree.” read more

Tax and Spend GOP

from Conservative Review:

Pain at the pump! GOP considers gas tax increase

On Monday morning, President Trump took to Twitter to announce a “big week for Infrastructure” (again) as the administration is set to roll out a $1.5 trillion plan to invest in American infrastructure. The administration claims that by relying on state and local governments, and with reductions in the federal budget, the cost to the federal government will be just $200 billion. read more

WND Exclusive: Hey, Mitch McConnell, ‘Lead’ is Part of Your Title!

Talk about leading from behind. We used to think it shameful that Obama would lead from behind, by letting other world leaders do whatever heavy lifting needed to be done (not that much ever had to be done), and then Obama would just hop on the bandwagon –being praised by leftists for it.

Obama was the king of leading from behind – until now. It seems our dear Senate majority leader, the one and only (thank heavens) Mitch McConnell may have dethroned the king. read more

Spendthrift House & Senate

from the American Spectator:

Sometimes posturing proves bad for posture. Standing for eight hours in four-inch heels strikes as just one of those times.

Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi grandstanded on immigration in the well of the House of Representatives on Wednesday. The media hailed the lengthy harangue as unprecedented. But surely this comes as not the first time a preachy liberal promised to take just one minute of your time only to conclude the lecture eight hours later. read more