Google+

The Next Victim of the Opioid Crisis – Home Depot

Theft has been a major issue involved in the ever-growing opioid crisis in America. People are legally prescribed opioid painkillers by their physicians, and find, very often, that they become addicted.

Well, they often can’t return to their doctor for another prescription, so are they forced to hit the streets in search of their next fix. However, the drugs aren’t free, and many who become dependent quickly realize they can’t afford to keep using. But the drug has taken hold and many cannot stop.

So they begin to sell their own possessions – until they run out. Then the now addicts turn to crime – to theft. And many times, the brick and mortar retail store pays the price of that theft.

from Zero Hedge:

“Happening Everywhere In Retail” – Home Depot Links Surge In Thefts To Opioid Crisis

The opioid crisis is evolving and is now becoming a burden on retailers, as addicts race to brick and mortar stores, hoping to steal merchandise, and if successful, sell it on the street or pawn it for cash to pay for their next fix.

An absolutely shocking account of this has come from Home Depot executives, who warn that the nation’s out of control opioid crisis has sparked a massive surge in thefts in stores across the country. read more

Is Healing the Blood-Brain Barrier the Key to Halting Dementia?

The results of new research that has reversed dementia in mice is impressive but some are questioning whether they will apply to humans
The results of new research that has reversed dementia in mice is impressive but some are questioning whether they will apply to humans

Two compelling new studies are building on a hypothesis suggesting age-related dementia is caused by a leaky blood-brain barrier, triggering neuro-inflammation and, ultimately, brain cell damage. The research reveals a novel anti-inflammatory drug can reverse brain aging in senile mice, but experts suggest the studies are interesting but not particularly applicable to human cases of dementia. read more

WND Exclusive – Take a toke, man – your town needs the tax money

from Brent Smith for World Net Daily:

There are some odd things going on in our country lately.

Yes, I know that’s a silly open-ended statement and could refer to just about anything these days. But I’m talking about the seeming disconnect between states and the federal government. Or more specifically, the disconnect between state and federal laws.

In this case, the disconnect between federal marijuana laws and that of the states.

Marijuana is considered an illegal substance by the feds, yet at least 11 states have legalized its purchase and consumption – either strictly medically and/or for recreational use.

The United States Constitution is unmistakably clear concerning the relationship of federal and state law.

Article VI, Section 2, states: read more

Big Government Will Lower Our Drug Prices!!

Isn’t it funny (not funny ha ha) that our government is the only one who is never to blame for price increases or shortages of any kind. It’s always Big Oil, the military industrial complex, etc. Or in this case, evil Big Pharma. We can’t name one industry that doesn’t get blamed for these occurrences (except of course, Big Education), yet the government, with its penchant for artificially picking winners and losers, escapes all scrutiny. We’re about to see it happen again. And when it has the opposite effect, we’ll all be instructed to once again blame “Big Pharma.”

from Human Events:

“Cold” Medicine: Canadian Drug Imports Will Cost Americans

The solution to drug prices is ending freeriding, not buying Canadian

In the hopes of lowering the cost of prescription drugs for Americans, the Trump Administration announced plans in late July to draft a proposal for the importation and sale of prescription drugs from Canada. The announcement was overshadowed by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s drug pricing bill and the bipartisan package before the Senate in September—but is a cause for concern, nonetheless. A dozen statesCongress—even the Trump Administration, despite initial opposition—are now considering such legislation.

If “buy-Canadian” doesn’t sound like a policy consistent with Trump’s platform of putting Americans first, that’s because it isn’t. Importing drugs from Canada is an ineffectual and counterproductive policy. President Trump had it right the first time. The prohibitive drug prices that Americans deal with are not solely caused by pharmaceutical companies; they are primarily the product of a failure of government policy.

Instead of artificial fixes, the Trump Administration should directly address the global freeloading and regulatory glut that’s costing Americans—both in dollars and lives. read more

A Single Injection for Peanut Allergy?

Medical scientists at Stanford University have set out to explore the potential of a drug called etokimab in treating peanut allergies
Medical scientists at Stanford University have set out to explore the potential of a drug called etokimab in treating peanut allergies

The long pursuit of a treatment for peanut allergy is littered with false dawns, but there are also some promising possibilities on the horizon, including one currently on the cusp of FDA approval. Another has just emerged via a promising early trial at Stanford University, where scientists found a single injection of an antibody treatment enabled those with severe allergies to stomach peanuts for some time. read more

Alzheimer’s Drug Makes a Comeback

The pharma company claims a previous decision to discontinue research into the drug was based on incomplete Phase 3 trial data and new analysis has revealed significant success
The pharma company claims a previous decision to discontinue research into the drug was based on incomplete Phase 3 trial data and new analysis has revealed significant success

In a stunningly unusual turn of events a new Alzheimer’s drug, previously declared a failure back in March, has been resurrected with the pharmaceutical company behind the treatment suggesting the earlier decision to discontinue the research was premature and based on incorrect data analysis. read more

Latest Diabetes Microcapsule

Diabetics may soon be able to take their insulin orally
Diabetics may soon be able to take their insulin orally

Earlier this year we covered a blueberry-sized capsule developed by researchers at MIT that would allow diabetics to take their insulin orally rather than by injection. That capsule contained microneedles to deliver the hormone through the stomach lining. Now, the same team has gone a step further, developing a new capsule that would survive a trip through the stomach and deliver its payload to the lining of the small intestine. read more

Pelosi’s Proposal Will Likely Kill Americans

from the American Spectator:

Pelosi’s Price-Control Prescription Would Cost American Lives

read more

eNose Predicts Immunotherapy Treatment Effectiveness

It's claimed the device achieves 85 percent accuracy in predicting which lung cancer patients will, or will not, respond to new immunotherapy treatments
It’s claimed the device achieves 85 percent accuracy in predicting which lung cancer patients will, or will not, respond to new immunotherapy treatments
Amsterdam University Medical Centers

An impressive new study is suggesting a simple breath analysis can accurately predict whether lung cancer patients will positively respond to novel immunotherapy treatments. Unlike current methods, which involve studying tissue samples, the new “eNose” device can offer diagnostic advice in less than 60 seconds. read more

Clouds aren’t the Only White Thing in Hurricane Dorian

from the Blaze: 

Hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of cocaine wash up on Florida beaches from Hurricane Dorian

Hurricane Dorian pushed hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of cocaine onto the beaches of Florida.

The first cocaine bricks, about 15 kilos worth in a red duffle bag, showed up over the weekend on Cocoa Beach. The cocaine was discovered by a beachgoer, who contacted the police. The find was reportedly worth roughly $300,000. read more