Trump Should Reconsider Ethanol Mandate

This is honest reporting. Many sites on the right do nothing but promote everything Trump. I as well support the President’s policies, but when he makes a wrong decision, he should be called out. This is one of those times and it’s important to point it out.

from IBD:

This is one campaign promise we wish President Trump would break. But alas, he just told his EPA to give up any thought of cutting back on the federal government’s anti-consumer, anti-environment ethanol mandate. Sad.

The story begins in 2005, when President Bush approved the Renewable Fuel Standard program as part of an energy bill, which required oil refiners to blend in predetermined amounts of “biofuels” into their gasoline, starting at 4 billion gallons in 2006.

A revised version of the RFS, which Bush signed in 2007, expanding the program, requiring ethanol levels to climb steadily to 36 billion gallons by 2022. read more

Biofuel Scam

from: IBD

 

 In yet another green folly, the lawless Environmental  Protection Agency continues to fine gasoline producers for not using cellulosic biofuels in quantities that don’t exist, making only more pain at the pump.

cellulosic-ethanolLast month, a federal court dealt a serious blow to the Environmental  Protection Agency’s renewable fuels push by ruling that the agency exceeded its authority by mandating refiners use cellulosic biofuels, which aren’t  commercially available. The EPA’s lawless response in a lawless administration was to raise its requirements.

In 2005 and 2007, Congress twice amended the Clean Air Act to establish a renewable fuel standard (RFS) that included a mandate to use cellulosic  biofuels.

If refiners failed to meet the goals, the EPA could fine them. The RFS set ambitious goals for cellulosic biofuels but at least charged the EPA with reducing the requirement if production was lower than the mandate.

This the EPA simply ignored, issuing fines for failing to use this biofuel when it wasn’t even available.

As Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner points out in Politico, 2010, the first year of the mandate, the EPA projected 5 million gallons of cellulosic biofuels would be available.

In fact, there were none. Not a single gallon. In 2011, the EPA increased the mandate to 6.5  million gallons. Again, the actual amount available was zero. Undeterred, in  2012, the EPA increased the required amount to 8.5 million gallons. The actual available amount was 25,000 gallons.

ScamThis absurdity prompted the American Petroleum Institute (API) to file a lawsuit last year challenging the EPA’s rulemaking. The API petitioned the court to review the EPA’s January 2012 RFS.

On Jan. 25, 2013, the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals agreed the EPA had  exceeded its authority. “(W)e agree with API that EPA’s 2012 projection of  cellulosic biofuel production was in excess of the agency’s statutory authority,” reads the court decision.

The court further told the agency: “The EPA points to no instance in which the term ‘projected’ is used to allow the projector to let its aspiration for a self-fulfilling prophecy divert it from a neutral methodology.”

The agency’s response to the court’s ruling, Sensenbrenner notes, was to  nearly double its 2013 mandate from 8.5 million gallons to 14 million gallons.

Different from corn- or sugar-based ethanol — which have questionable benefits — cellulosic ethanol is made from wood chips, switch grass and  agricultural waste, such as corncobs.

The EPA’s requirement for 14 million gallons of the stuff is about as realistic as that trillion-dollar coin some have proposed to solve our fiscal problems.