Moscow Worried About U.S. Presence in Poland

from Zero Hedge:

Poland Wants The US Military Presence To Be Permanent And Is Ready To Pay

Moscow has expressed its concern over NATO’s military infrastructure that has been built adjacent to the Russian border. On May 28, Kremlin Spokesman Dmitry Peskov declared that Russia is prepared to take appropriate measures in response. That statement was a reaction to Warsaw’s plans to host a permanent US military presence on its territory. read more

World War III Anyone?

by: the Common Constitutionalist

A 25 page document recently released by the Atlantic Council (AC), based in the U.S., states that Russia could “attack Poland overnight.”

The report claims that Russia could take advantage of NATO “being distracted by another crisis” or by misinterpreting activities NATO is involved in. After the annex of Crimea in 2014, the Baltic States have become legitimately nervous, wondering who Ruusia’s next target may be.

Many of these think tanks are employed from time to time to hash out war-game scenarios, as it were. But this is no game. The Atlantic Council is deadly serious, even going so far as to suggest possible counterattack targets should Russia decide to move on Poland – targets including the Kaliningrad and Metro Moscow.

They warned that “Even if Moscow currently has no immediate intent to challenge NATO directly, this may unexpectedly change overnight.” The Council also recommends that the Obama administration authorize more shipments of missiles to the Baltic region. read more

No Professor – The Nazis Killed the Polish Jews!

by: the Common Constitutionalist

So your dream is to send your son or daughter off to an esteemed Ivy League School, where they may receive a superior education and be imparted the knowledge that other colleges just can’t offer.

Well, maybe you should twice about that. Especially if they decide to take a history class taught by professor Jan Gross at Princeton University.
He is a well established Polish-American educator who has also taught at Yale, NYU and in Paris. He also received the Order of Merit from the Polish Government in 1996.

But he may be stripped of that title due a an angry article he wrote in a German Newspaper, Die Welt, where he claimed that the Poles killed more Jews during WWII than did the Nazis.

HUH?

And why would he claim such a thing? It’s because Poland refuses thus far to swing open its doors to Middle Eastern “refugees” the way Germany has. So the professor has determined to make them pay for that decision – even going so far as to say the “hideous face of Poles had roots in the past.”

So let’s just see who killed all those Poles during World War II. read more

Warsaw Uprising

Black and white silent footage taken during  the 1944 Warsaw Uprising against the Nazis have been turned into a mesmerising  feature movie with sound and color.

The film is a riveting account of the  fierce  house-to-house fighting against the German army that began on  August 1 and  ended 63 days later with the insurgents surrendering,  following the deaths of  some 200,000 rebels and residents.

Titled Warsaw Rising, the film shows the  crews that the Polish resistance Home Army sent fanning through the city to  chronicle the uprising.

Captivating footage: Black and white footage taken during the 1944 Warsaw Uprising against the Nazis have been turned into a mesmerising feature film with sound and colour
Captivating footage: Black and white footage taken  during the 1944 Warsaw Uprising against the Nazis have been turned into a  mesmerizing feature film with sound and color

 

Oops!

Have you heard the one about the Polish construction crew?

Chateau de Bellevue, 12km to the east of Bordeaux, France, once boasted 140,000-square-feet of grand reception rooms, ornate fireplaces, winding marble staircases and imposing granite balconies.

Then its new owner, a Russian millionaire businessman, employed a team of Polish builders to renovate the manor to its former baroque glory, including the removal of one  small building.

Well, the blundering builders mistakenly bulldozed an 18th-century chateau in the heart of France’s picturesque wine country – when they were only supposed to knock down an outhouse on its estate.

The workers apparently misunderstood the instructions and pulled down the castle instead, leaving the outhouse completely untouched.

No you see it: The Chateau de Bellevue was considered a local treasure boasting a grand hall that could host some 200 people, as well as a sweeping stone staircaseNo you see it: The Chateau de Bellevue was considered a local treasure boasting a grand hall that could host some 200 people, as well as  a sweeping stone staircase
Now you don't: Workers who were hired to renovate the grand 140,000-square-foot manor and raze a small building on the same estate in southwest France mixed them upNow you don’t: Workers who were hired to renovate the grand 140,000-square-foot manor and raze a small building on the same estate in southwest France mixed them up

‘The Chateau de Bellevue was Yvrac’s pride and joy,’ said former owner Juliette Marmie. ‘The whole village is in shock. How  can this construction firm make such a mistake?’

Local media reported that the construction company misunderstood the renovation plans of the current owner, Russian businessman Dmitry Stroskin, to clean up and renovate the manor.

Stroskin was away when the calamity occurred and returned home to discover his chateau, a local treasure whose grand hall could host some 200 people, was nothing but rubble.

'We're in shock': The outhouse that the builders were supposed to destroy is now the only part of the once lavish property still standing‘We’re in shock’: The outhouse that the builders were supposed to destroy is now the only part of the once lavish property still standing
Piles of rubble: The Polish builders misunderstood the instructions to clean up the building and restore it to its former gloryPiles of rubble: The Polish builders misunderstood the  instructions to clean up the building and restore it to its former glory
Task ahead: The castle's Russian millionaire owner Dmitry Stroskin has vowed to rebuild it stone by stone into an exact replica The castle’s Russian millionaire owner  Dmitry Stroskin has vowed to rebuild it stone by stone into an exact replica

Stroskin, who works in Warsaw, told the local paper, Sud Ouest: ‘I didn’t know the chateau had been destroyed, I’m in shock.  Even if it was in a very bad state, I had wanted to renovate it.’

He told them he plans to build an exact replica of lost manor on the site.

Attribution: Matt Blake

Kutno, 1940

The old man looks relaxed, almost happy chatting with the soldiers. He and most of the other Jewish citizens pictured here in 1939 and 1940, are smiling, seemingly pleased to pose for photographer Hugo Jaeger.

Yet we know, 40 years later, that these people, and thousands of others like them, were in fact prisoners, to be despized as ‘rats’ and ‘parasites’ in Nazi propaganda.

Even more surprising, Jaeger was Hitler’s personal photographer, enjoying unprecedented access to the Third Reich’s upper echelon, traveling with the Fuhrer to his massive rallies and photographing him at intimate parties and during private moments.

An elderly man with a yellow Star of David fixed to his chest, speaks with German officers as he and other Jews are rounded up in Kunto, German-occupied Poland in 1939 An elderly man with a yellow Star of David fixed to his  chest, speaks with German officers as he and other Jews are rounded up in Kunto,  German-occupied Poland in 1939The photos, released to mark the official establishment of the Warsaw Ghetto in October 1940, were taken in the town of Kutno, 75 miles west of the Polish capital Warsaw.Although a staunch Nazi, Jaeger as  photographer perhaps perceived the Polish Jews as fascinating subjects  and his  work depicts their tragic circumstances while at the same time  allowing them to  retain their humanity and dignity.

Apart from the odd soldier, there is very little German military presense. Instead the series shows the devastation in the landscape of the German invasion of Poland, while revealing very little of the ‘master race’ itself.

Exactly what Jaeger had in mind is of course a matter of guesswork, but from the reactions of the people portrayed in these images in Warsaw and Kutno, there appears to be  surprising little hostility between the photographer and his subjects.

Innocent victims: These young Jewish girls couldn't possibly have imagined horrors lay ahead as pose outside their tent in another haunting photograph taken by the ardent Nazi Hugo JaegerInnocent victims: These young Jewish girls couldn’t  possibly have  imagined horrors that lay ahead as pose outside their tent in  another  of Jaeger’s haunting photographs
Ghetto boys: In their tattered rags the two boys smile for the camera, but the man in the centre, most probably their father, has a look of distrust etched across his face Ghetto boys: In their tattered rags the two boys smile  for the camera, but the man in the centre, most probably their father, has a  look of distrust etched across his faceJaeger’s photos made such an  impression on  the Führer that he announced, upon first seeing his work: ‘The future belongs to  color photography.’But beyond recording Hitler’s endless travels, Jaeger also documented the progress of the Reich, including  the Nazi  invasion of Poland in 1939.

The Kutno pictures serve as a unique curiosity. Why, instead of focussing on the glories of Hitler’s third Reich, did a staunch Nazi like Jaeger chose to take pictures of conquered Jews?

In June 1940, all 8,000 of Kutno’s Jews were rounded up and taken to what would be their new home – the grounds of an old sugar factory – where hundreds would die of hunger and Typhus.

Poles and Jews, friends and neighbors, were separated from one another. A Jewish council, the Judenrat, was created and tasked with forcing Jews to obey their German overlords.

While most photographs taken by the Nazis focus on the glory and triumphalism of the Reich, in this unusual set of pictures, Hugo Jaeger has chosen instead to capture the misery of the conquered While most Jaeger’s photographs focus on the glory and  triumphalism of the Reich, here he  has chosen instead to capture the misery of  the conquered people instead
With their clean clothes and hair neatly coiffured, these three young women do not at first glance appear to be Jewish. But look closer and you find a star of David on the coat of the girl on the leftWith their clean clothes and hair neatly coiffured,  these three young  women do not, at first glance, appear anything like Jaeger’s  other subjects. But look closer and  you find a star of David on the coat of the  girl on the left
An elderly Jewish woman bends over outdoor rubble that serves as a kitchen while a man, his Star of David badge clealry visible, watches over her in the Kutno GhettoAn elderly Jewish woman bends over outdoor rubble that  serves as a kitchen while a man, his Star of David badge clealry visible,  watches over her in the Kutno Ghetto
Makeshift dwelling: Jewish inhabitants of the Kutno Ghetto stand near a car which has been converted into a makeshift house in early 1940Makeshift dwelling: Jewish inhabitants of the Kutno  Ghetto stand near a car which has been converted into a makeshift house in early  1940
A young woman clutches a jug as she escorts an elderly Jewish man through the Kutno Ghetto in early 1940A young woman clutches a jug as she escorts an elderly  Jewish man through the Kutno Ghetto in early 1940
Daily life: An aerial view of the Kutno Ghetto which was set up on the grounds of a sugar factoryDaily life: An aerial view of the Kutno Ghetto which was  set up on the grounds of a sugar factory
A Jewish woman uses a washing board to clean clothes in the Kutno. Unusually for an ardent Nazi, Jaeger's allowed his Jewish subjects to retain their dignity and humanityA Jewish woman uses a washing board to clean clothes in  the Kutno. Unusually for an ardent Nazi, Jaeger’s allowed his Jewish subjects to  retain their dignity and humanity
Despite the awfulness of her predicament, this Jewish woman manages to smile brightly for the camera as she poses for JaegerDespite the awfulness of her predicament, this Jewish  woman manages to smile brightly for the camera as she poses for Jaeger

A lucky few managed to escape and were sheltered by their Polish friends. Most were not so lucky.

In 1942, as part of Hitler’s ‘final solution’  the Nazis began Operation Reinhardt, the plan to eliminate all of Poland’s Jews. In the spring of 1942 the Kutno Ghetto itself was ‘liquidated.’ The majority of its inhabitants were sent to the Chelmno extermination camp.

The unique set of pictures could have been lost forever were it not for a bottle of brandy. As the allies advanced into Germany in 1945, Jaeger hid his photographs in a leather suitcase.

He was then confronted by a group of American soldiers. Luckily they were distracted by a bottle of Cognac which they opened and shared with the photographer.

Had they searched the case further, and found so many pictures of Hitler, Jaeger would have most likely been arrested on the the spot and tried as a war criminal.

After such a close shave, Jaeger decided to bury the pictures inside 12 glass jars outside Munich. He would periodically return to their burial place to check they were safe.

In 1955, he dug them up and stored them in a bank vault. Ten years later, in 1965, he sold them to Life magazine.

Fate: In 1942, as part of Hitler's 'final solution' the Nazis began Operation Reinhardt, the plan to eliminate all of Poland's Jews. In the spring of 1942 the Kutno Ghetto itself was 'liquidated'Fate: In 1942, as part of Hitler’s ‘final solution’ the  Nazis began Operation Reinhardt, the plan to eliminate all of Poland’s Jews. In  the spring of 1942 the Kutno Ghetto itself was ‘liquidated’

Attribution: Daniel Miller