Google+

Discriminating Antibiotics

Researchers at Penn State have developed an antibiotic that targets a specific species of bad bacteria,...
Researchers at Penn State have developed an antibiotic that targets a specific species of bad bacteria, without harming the good ones in your gut(Credit: phodopus/Depositphotos)

Antibiotics are effective at killing bacteria (for now, at least), but they aren’t very picky, indiscriminately wiping out both good and bad bacteria. This can upset the fragile balance of your microbiome, which is increasingly being linked to general health and wellbeing. Now, researchers at Penn State have developed a new approach to make a drug that can single out a specific, opportunistic bacteria known as C. difficile. read more

New Kitty Hawk Flyer

With pontoon-shaped landing skids, the Flyer is clearly designed to be flown over water
With pontoon-shaped landing skids, the Flyer is clearly designed to be flown over water(Credit: Kitty Hawk)

Larry Page’s Kitty Hawk startup has been beavering away on several different personal flight projects, including a self-piloting, electric VTOL air taxi that can be used for Uber Elevate-style aerial commuting. The Silicon Valley company has also been working on something sportier – a single-seat multicopter fun machine called the Flyer. And today, the team released images and partial specs on what looks to be the final production design. read more

Sonic Soak Portable Ultrasonic Washer

The Sonic Soak uses ultrasound waves to clean clothes
The Sonic Soak uses ultrasound waves to clean clothes(Credit: ​Sonic Soak)

Finding time to wash your clothes is difficult enough at home, but it’s even more of a hassle when you’re traveling. The Sonic Soak is designed to act like a tiny, portable washing machine, using sound waves to clean clothes – including your delicates – as well as jewelry, toothbrushes, cutlery, baby items, fruit, veggies and basically whatever else can be thrown into a tub of water with it. read more

First 3D Printed Human Corneas

Co-author Dr. Steve Swioklo (left) and Prof. Che Connon, with a 3D-printed cornea
Co-author Dr. Steve Swioklo (left) and Prof. Che Connon, with a 3D-printed cornea(Credit:Newcastle University)

There’s a limited supply of donor human corneas, meaning that not everyone who needs an eyesight-saving transplant can get one. As a result, biosynthetic corneas have recently been developed. These could become quicker and easier to produce, as scientists have now successfully 3D-printed the things. read more

New Drug Delivery for Brain Cancer

An artist's rendition of MIT's new nanoparticles, which can carry two forms of drug to combat...
An artist’s rendition of MIT’s new nanoparticles, which can carry two forms of drug to combat brain cancer(Credit: Stephen Morton)

Glioblastoma is one of the most deadly forms of cancer. Affecting the brain, those unlucky enough to receive a diagnosis don’t have many treatment options – and usually a median life expectancy of just over a year. Now, researchers at MIT have developed nanoparticles that could provide hope, crossing the blood-brain barrier and delivering two types of drugs to fight tumors. read more

Cassette Decks Making a Comeback

The Tascam 202mkVII dual cassette deck is available now
The Tascam 202mkVII dual cassette deck is available now(Credit: Tascam)

Though digital music accounts for much of what we now listen to, old school formats like vinyl and audio cassettes steadfastly refuse to disappear. The former is enjoying something of a healthy revival at the moment, but trying to find an album released on audio cassette is a little more challenging. read more

Pangaea Supercontinent Timeline may be Wrong

An artist's rendition of Cifelliodon wahkarmoosuch, a transitional creature between reptiles and mammals that may readjust...
An  artist’s rendition of Cifelliodon wahkarmoosuch, a transitional creature between reptiles and mammals that may readjust our understanding of when the supercontinent Pangaea broke apart(Credit: Jorge A. Gonzalez)

If you feel like you’ve had some drawn-out breakups, they probably have nothing on the supercontinent of Pangaea, which took tens of millions of years to split up. But now, a unique fossil skull might readjust the timeline, with a strange creature turning up on a different continent to its previously-discovered relatives. read more

Enzymes Cause Cancer to Die of Old Age

Cancer hijacks a natural anti-aging enzyme to make itself immortal, and now scientists have found a...
Cancer hijacks a natural anti-aging enzyme to make itself immortal, and now scientists have found a way to counteract that process(Credit: Sashkin7/Depositphotos)

At the cellular level, aging and cancer are two sides of the same coin. The mechanism that limits a cell’s lifespan can be slowed down, but that can turn them cancerous, as they divide unchecked.

Now, scientists at EPFL have found a way to manipulate that mechanism to effectively turn off cancer’s immortality, letting it die slowly and naturally. read more

Supplement May Reverse Aging

Researchers have found that a commercially available supplement can improve dilation of a subjects’ arteries by...
Researchers have found that a commercially available supplement can improve dilation of a subjects’ arteries by 42 percent in response to increased blood flow(Credit:idcde/Depositphotos)

Much mystery surrounds the physiological processes by which humans age, but scientists are learning more all the time. With this knowledge come new possibilities around how we can not only slow them down, but possibly even reverse them. A new breakthrough at the University of Colorado is the latest advance in the area, demonstrating how a chemically altered nutritional supplement may well reverse aging of the blood vessels, in turn giving cardiovascular health a vital boost. read more

World’s Largest 3-D Printer

Titomic unveiled the world's largest 3D printer this week in Melbourne, Australia
Titomic unveiled the world’s largest 3D printer this week in Melbourne, Australia(Credit: Titomic)

Australian company Titomic has unveiled what it claims is the world’s largest metal 3D printer at its fully automated Melbourne facility. Utilizing a patented process co-developed with Australian federal scientific research agency the CSIRO, the 3D metal printer boasts a build area 9 m long, 3 m wide and 1.5 m high (29.5 x 9.8 x 4.9 ft), however the printing process isn’t constrained to this booth size, meaning it could be used to print even larger objects. read more