Podcast – HuffPo Loves Government Mandated Overtime – Congresswoman Suffers Swatting Hoax – Zika is Spreading in America

A writer at the Huffington Post is hailing Obama’s latest control issue – mandatory government decreed overtime pay for the private sector. He says it will likely benefit 12 million American families. I disagree.

I speak in segment two of a computer generating swatting hoax perpetrated on a Massachusetts Congresswoman in retaliation for a bill she introduced to prevent online harassment.

The Zika Virus has hit America, but don’t worry – it has nothing at all to do with the huge influx of immigrants streaming across our border. The CDC assures of that. Coincidently, I disagree with this also. read more

White House’s False Sequester Claims Prompt Media Pushback

 

FACT CHECK: Obama’s Claims About Capitol’s Janitors, Security Guards Are False

The White House’s media management team will be in the public spotlight this week following a series of days in which it leveraged the media to distribute what turned out to be misleading or false information.

President Barack Obama told reporters that Capitol Hill workers were facing pay cuts as a result of the looming budget sequester. Education Secretary Arne Duncan cited the same cause when he incorrectly claimed that a school district was already laying off teachers. And White House spokesman Jay Carney understated by a factor of 10 the number of illegal immigrants administration officials released in a bid to lower the cost of housing inmates in immigration detention facilities.

Those statements came as the White House sought to create public anger about Republicans’ refusal to vote for additional new tax revenues as part of a last-minute budget deal to forestall the sequester, which will force mandatory across-the-board cuts across much of the federal budget. Continue Reading

Sequestration and the End of the World, Continued

by: the Common Constitutionalist

The White House, the Democrats and their stenographers, the media, have really ramped up the hysteria and hyperbole regarding the March 1 sequester deadline. As for the deadline, to hear these folks whine about it, especially our president, you’d think it really was a dead-line.

sob storyI swear I’ve heard the president say, from one speech to another, that virtually every public sector employee will lose his or her job. It appears this is shaping up to be the mother of all crises. And need I remind you what they say about a good crisis. This is how wedded the government is to our tax dollars.

Now keep in mind that the following list of tragedies that is sure to befall us is only a fraction of the Armageddon this administration is predicting. All this for a lousy 2% cut spending. That’s the equivalent of a person making $50,000 per year giving up one Starbucks coffee a day.

Air travel will be disrupted due to an estimated 47,000 FAA workers being laid off. The TSA will have to let employees go. Of course that will not only cause delays but also security problems. Terrorists, realizing our sudden vulnerability will rush to the nearest airport to wreak havoc knowing the TSA is not on the job. Terrorists such as little four-year-old wheelchair-bound girls and ninety-year old grandma’s may now slip through undetected. The horror!

Hurricanes and other severe weather events will no longer be predicted due to deep cuts at NOAA. Deputy commerce secretary Rebecca M Blank states, “The government runs the risk of significantly increased forecast errors and the government’s ability to warn Americans across the country about high-impact weather events, such as hurricanes and tornadoes, will be compromised.”

Layoffs of over 36,000 at the Bureau of prisons will lead to a dangerous situation of inmate violence according to Eric Holder.pink slip

Uh Oh! Gun violence alert! FBI director Robert Mueller warned the Congress and Senate that gun background checks would be impeded, increasing the likelihood of convicted felons ending up with weapons. Because that’s how felons always get their weapons. They don’t steal them; they attempt to purchase them legally.

Now if I were this administration, what other hot button issues could I scare the general public with? Well, we all eat. How about a nationwide shutdown of meat and poultry plants. This is what agriculture secretary Vilsack is warning of. That will certainly scare the public.

What else? Illegal immigration is a concern of the right. Immigration courts, judges and interpreters will be affected leading to a flood of aliens entering our country illegally. The question is, how will we tell?

Is that it? Is that not esequester-cartoon-bensonnough to tip the scale for you? Well, there’s more. There’s always more.

HHS secretary Kathleen Sebelius claims over 370,000 mentally ill and emotionally disturbed patients will lose vital services. 125,000 additional homeless people will be left wandering the streets. 600,000 women and children will be thrown off WIC. 424,000 AIDS patients will be denied medication and housing assistance. Over 800,000 American Indians will be denied hospital care. No Headstart for 70,000 kids and no child care for another 30,000.

I could go on and on. Just realize that a paltry 2% cut and spend during will result in the total meltdown of our society, evidently.

Now the $64,000 question is, do you believe it? Do you believe the government when they describe such wanton destruction from such a small cut? Well that’s what they are banking on. That’s what progressives do. That’s all they have as motivation; fear. They bank on the ignorant public’s fear of the unknown.

But every once in a while the media will slip up and practice a random act of journalism. It doesn’t happen often but it does prove that these folks (reporters) can do their job; they just choose not to.

ABC news reporter, John Karl, was discussing the looming sequester with host George Snuffleupagus, when he let something slip. They were discussing homeland security cuts when Karl stated, “Yet, despite all the dire warnings and inability to reach an agreement, the spending cuts represent only a fraction of total federal spending. In fact, even with the cuts, the federal government will spend about $15 billion more this year than it spent last year.”spending

What? Did I hear that right? You mean to tell me that these dire warnings of world ending sequestration-spending cuts will result in a budget increase this year? Why is this the first time we are hearing of this? Well, it isn’t. I wrote about this just a few days ago. Remember; it’s called Baseline Budgeting.

So you see, once again, this hand wringing and teeth gnashing is all about nothing. Let me correct that. It’s definitely about something. The left has a lot to lose if the bogus spending cuts are allowed to happen.

The progressives cannot afford for the ignorant to discover they’ve been lied to. If the sequester “cuts” are allowed and the world doesn’t end, the public may just realize that budget cuts aren’t as tragic as they have been portrayed. This is why we see the full-court press.

After all the warnings of doom and gloom, the left knows these cuts won’t even be noticed by the majority of voters and they can’t allow their lie to be exposed. When the public realizes these cuts have little to no effect on their lives, they may actually demand more and the progressives can’t have that.

That’s what this whole production is all about. It’s as simple as that.

Tis the Season for Layoffs

All these layoffs and closings have been announced in just the first few days after the reelection of the president. I predict many, many more will come.

Energizer

The St. Louis-based company said Thursday that it expects to shed about 1,500 employees. When finished, the restructuring should lead to $200 million in pretax yearly savings, Energizer said. It aims to have most of its restructuring steps finished by the end of September 2014.

Westinghouse

Westinghouse Anniston, the contractor responsible for shutting down Anniston’s chemical weapons incinerator, has reduced its workforce by another 50 employees.

Research in Motion Limited

Research in Motion Ltd., the maker of BlackBerry smartphones, laid off about 200 people at its U.S. headquarters in Irving on Wednesday, according to a source close to the company who did not want to be named.

Lightyear Network Solutions

More than one dozen employees at a Pikeville company lost their jobs this week. Officials with Lightyear Network Solutions said they are consolidating offices in Louisville and Pikeville to save money.

Providence Journal –

The Providence Journal Co. laid off 23 full-time workers Wednesday as part of a cost-cutting effort, including 16 members of the Providence Newspaper Guild and 7 non-union employees.

Hawker Beechcraft –

The company says 240 employees will lose their jobs with the closing of Hawker Beechcraft Services facilities in Little Rock, Ark.; Mesa, Ariz.; and San Antonio, Texas.

Boeing (30% of their management staff) –

Boeing Co. said Wednesday it plans to employ 30% fewer executives at its Boeing Defense, Space & Security unit by the end of 2012 compared to 2010 levels.

CVPH Medical Center –

CVPH Medical Center has handed pink slips to 17 employees. The layoffs — nine in management and eight hourly staffers — are part of an effort to “help bolster the hospital’s financial position in 2013 and beyond,” a press release said.

US Cellular

The move will result in 980 job cuts at U.S. Cellular, with 640 in the Chicago area, according to a spokeswoman. The cuts are slightly under 12 percent of the approximately 8,400 total employees U.S. Cellular had at the end of the third quarter.

Momentive Performance Materials –

About 150 workers at Sistersville’s Momentive Performance Materials plant will be temporarily laid off later this month, officials said this week.

• Rocketdyne –

About 100 employees at Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne, most of whom work in the San Fernando Valley, were laid off Wednesday in response to dwindling government spending on space exploration, the company said. The layoffs were effective immediately, and 75 percent of them came at the facilities on Canoga and De Soto avenues, which employ about 1,100 people. The company has six sites across the Valley.

Brake Parts

The leader of an automotive parts plant in Lincoln County has told state officials that there are plans to lay off 75 workers starting in late December…The layoffs are expected to start Dec. 28 and continue in the first quarter of 2013

Vestas Wind Systems

Vestas Wind Systems A/S (VWS) is seeking to sell a stake of as much as 20 percent and said it’s reducing headcount by 3,000 to raise the staff cuts by the biggest wind turbine maker to almost a third over two years.

Husqvarna –

Husqvarna AB (HUSQB), the world’s biggest maker of powered garden tools, plans to cut about 600 jobs in a move that will save 220 million kronor ($33 million) a year by 2014.

Center for Hospice New York –

The Center for Hospice and Palliative Care plans to temporarily lay off as many as 40 employees next year as it embarks on a major renovation of the inpatient unit at its Cheektowaga campus.

Bristol-Meyers –

Bristol-Myers Squibb is following up its lackluster third-quarter results with almost 480 layoffs. As Pharmalot reports, the company notified the New Jersey government that it would scale back in Plainsboro, which means the cuts will hit its sales operations.

OCE North America

Trumbull printer- and scanning-equipment provider Oce North America, Inc. will lay off 135 workers in three Connecticut communities, including East Hartford, according to its notice with the state Labor Department.

• Darden Restaurants –

The company, which was among those who had received an Obamacare waiver in the past, is looking to limit workers to 28 hours per week. A full time employee that is required to have health insurance (lest the employer pay a fine) works 30 hours per week, as defined by the Obamacare law.

• West Ridge Mine –

In its statement, UtahAmerican Energy blames the Obama administration for instituting policies that will close down “204 American coal-fired power plants by 2014″ and for drastically reducing the market for coal.

United Blood Services Gulf –

United Blood Services Gulf South region, the non-profit blood service provider for much of south Louisiana and Mississippi, will lay off approximately 10 percent of its workforce. It was a hard decision to make according to Susan Begnaud, Regional Center Director for the Gulf South region.

A layoff is tough enough for employees to deal with, imagine hearing the crushing news that your office is shutting down just before Thanksgiving and Christmas…  Here are some of the business closings that were announced in just the past two days:

There will be hundreds or thousands more. This is just the beginning.

Attribution: The Blaze

The Affordable Act that Doesn’t Care

Dana considering layoffs as Obamacare costs mount

by:

Dana Holding Corp., recently announced their third quarter results, reporting a 12% decrease in sales and net income of $56 million, compared to with $110 million for the same period in 2011.

The global auto parts manufacturer properly characterized their earnings as solid, and several media outlets covered the details.

Most of the news reports also mentioned the letter President and CEO Roger Wood sent to employees that called for continued vigilance in light of falling commercial vehicle demand in North America and continued economic uncertainty:

The uncertain global economic environment continues to put pressure on production in Europe, China, and Brazil. In North America, as evidenced not only by our earnings release, but by many other companies as well, there is a looming concern in the economy. The threats of a fiscal cliff, along with increasing taxes on small businesses, are holding down job creation and optimism for growth in the United States. These economic factors affect Dana in that we must always be sure that we are keeping our costs in line with our revenue changes.

But that’s where most media coverage stopped. The next paragraph in the letter told the real story:

We must also offset increased costs that are placed on us through new laws and regulations. For example, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, also known as “Obamacare,” is expected to cost Dana approximately $24 million over the next six years in additional U.S. health care expenses. This is a cost that our customers are not willing to cover, mandating that we reduce our overhead expenses to cover them.

Yes, you read that correctly: $24 million over the next six years. And they can’t pass that along to their customers, so they have to reduce their overhead.
That means layoffs, because there’s really no other way for a company to cover that much expense, especially in a recession.

In June, Dana employed 25,500 in 47 countries. By September, they’d shed 1,000 jobs, some of them from planned actions like their divestiture of their Fredericktown, Ohio, facility; the planned closures of their Longview, Texas, and Toledo, Ohio, facilities; and the consolidation of their Rochester Hills, Mich., and Milwaukee, Wisc., plants into other facilities.

But last Friday they laid off seven white collar staff at corporate offices here in the Toledo area. I’ve been told by company insiders that more are being considered.
So while President Barack Obama is campaigning on his auto bailout and the jobs it supposedly saved, his Affordable Care Act – Obamacare – is going to cost jobs … in that same automotive industry.

Dana may be able to survive the increased costs of “affordable” care, but not without consequences for some of their employees.

Other small businesses and their workers won’t be so lucky.

Such a Hater

Is it wrong to “Hate” the policies of this administration with their jackbooted thugs at the EPA and their war on everything, including jobs, in the name of JUNK science? Just one more example of tyranny on parade.

by: Moe Lane

Well, your ability to guess why the Murray Energy Corporation today announced that it is closing a mine in Brilliant, Ohio will be largely dependent on whether you rely on local news or not.  If you’re just paying attention to local news… you won’t be told at all why a coal mine that employed 239 people at its peak laid off 24 of its remaining 56 employees today, with the remaining to be (hopefully) integrated into the company elsewhere; in fact, you won’t even be told that the mine employed that many people directly.  But if you go to the company’s own press release… yeah.  That’s a different story.

Regulatory actions by President Barack Obama and his appointees and followers were cited as the entire reason.

“Mr. Obama has already destroyed 83,000 megawatts of coal-fired electricity generation in America,” said Mr. Michael T. W. Carey, Vice President of Government Affairs for Murray Energy. “Electric prices in the recent PJM Interconnection monthly auction were bid up 800 percent (8 times) for 2015-2016 because of this,” he added.

“At its peak, OhioAmerican employed 239 local people in high-paying, well-benefited jobs,” said Mr. Stanley T. Piasecki, General Manager and Superintendent. “University studies show that our Mines can create up to eleven (11) secondary jobs in our communities, for store clerks, teachers, etc., to serve our direct employees. Thus, if one uses the eleven (11) to one (1) multiplier, the Obama Administration has destroyed 2,868 jobs in eastern Ohio with this forced Mine closure,” stated Mr. Piasecki.

Although, to be fair, the local news article did at least link to the press release; it also mentioned another set of layoffs (29) at Murray’s Powhatan No. 6 mine in Alledonia, OH.  They just forgot to note that Murray Energy squarely laid the blame for that closure too on the Obama Administration’s War on Coal.  And make no mistake: this administration hates coal.

Going Postal

From Hope Yen of the AP:

WASHINGTON — A Senate bill aimed at saving the U.S. Postal Service would make it harder to close thousands of low-revenue post offices and end Saturday mail delivery, even though the struggling agency says those moves are just what’s needed to reduce its massive debt and become profitable again.

The measure takes steps to help the agency avert bankruptcy as early as this fall, through a cash infusion of $11 billion to pay off debt and reduce costs by offering retirement incentives to 100,000 employees. But the bill sidesteps decisions on postal closings, buying time for lawmakers who would rather avoid the wrath of voters in an election year.

The Senate planned to vote quite soon on a final bill, after considering amendments that could restrict the Postal Service from further cuts to first-class mail delivery. During debate, lawmakers agreed to hold off closing rural post offices for a year, give communities new ways to appeal, prevent any closings before the November elections but also shut five of the seven post offices on the Capitol grounds.

The final bill was expected to pass the Senate but faces an uncertain future. The House has not taken up its own version, which would create a national commission with the power to scrap no-layoff clauses in employee contracts.

“This of course kicks the can down the road,” complained Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., who unsuccessfully pushed for a commission in the Senate bill. He said the current proposal failed to address longer-term fixes and delayed major decisions. “We’ll be on the floor in two years addressing this issue again, because it is not a solution.”

Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe also has criticized the Senate bill as a short-term answer. Noting that more people every year are switching to the Internet to send letters and pay bills, he has called the Postal Service’s business model “broken.” The agency has estimated that the Senate bill would only provide it enough liquidity to continue operating for two years or three years.

The Postal Service said Wednesday it preferred legislation “that will provide it with the speed and flexibility to adapt to a changing marketplace for mailing and shipping products.”

At stake are more than 100,000 jobs, part of a postal cost-cutting plan to save some $6.5 billion a year by closing up to 252 mail-processing centers and 3,700 post offices. The agency, $12 billion in debt, says it needs to begin closings this year. At the request of Congress, Donahoe agreed to delay closings until May 15 to give lawmakers time to pass legislation.

The Senate bill proposes cutting about half the mail processing centers the Postal Services wants to close, from 252 to 125, and allowing more areas to maintain overnight first-class mail delivery for at least three more years. Beyond the one-year freeze on closing rural post offices, the Postal Service would face additional layers of approval before closing any mail facility.

The Postal Service on Tuesday circulated a smaller list of mail processing centers that probably would close under the Senate bill; many in more rural or small states would be spared. For instance, centers would survive in Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Missouri and Vermont, whose senators were sponsors of the postal bill or pushed amendments, according to the preliminary list obtained by The Associated Press. A facility in Easton, Md., also would stay open. Sen. Barbara Mikulski, D-Md., previously attempted to block the postal bill in protest of that specific closure.

Also surviving were all four mail processing centers in Nevada, home to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, as well as all eight centers in Colorado and all five centers in Utah.

The Postal Service would get an infusion of roughly $11 billion, which is basically a refund of overpayments made in previous years to a federal retirement fund. The money could pay down debt and finance buyouts to 100,000 postal employees.

The agency could make smaller annual payments into a future retiree health benefits account, gain flexibility in trimming worker compensation benefits and find additional ways to raise postal revenue under a new chief innovation officer.

An amendment approved Tuesday would bar the Postal Service from closing post offices for one year if they are in areas with fewer than 50,000 people, unless there was no significant community opposition.

After one year, the agency would have to take rural issues into special consideration. Post offices generally would be protected if the closest mail facility was more than 10 miles away.

“Our post offices are the lifeblood for towns across our state and a source of good-paying jobs in areas hard-hit by the economic downturn,” said Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., who co-sponsored the amendment. “This amendment protects rural post offices, with a realistic eye toward the future.”

Attribution: Karen