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Lobsters are the Key To Jellyfish Blooms

A deep sea image showing a Norway lobster munching on a jellyfish
A deep sea image showing a Norway lobster munching on a jellyfish(Credit: Heriot-Watt University)

Jellyfish blooms are regarded by some as an ecological menace, but they may sound the dinner gong for the commercially valuable Norway lobster. Recently, a team of scientists from Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh have photographed the tasty crustacean in the waters off western Norway chowing down on jellyfish carcasses, suggesting that they could form a major part of its diet.

The 25-cm (10-in) Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus), also known as the Dublin Bay prawn, langoustine, or scampi, is the most important commercial crustacean in Europe, responsible for revenues of £78 million (US$105 million) to Scotland alone. They’re remarkably abundant in the north-eastern Atlantic and parts of the Mediterranean, and they’re cheaper than the larger common lobster. Each year 60,000 tonnes of them are hauled in with half taken in British waters. read more