Take 3D Photos with New iPhone 8

The camera in the iPhone 7 Plus was deemed the ‘future of photography’ – but the technology set for the 10th-anniversary is said to be ‘revolutionary’.

An analyst has revealed that Apple is planning on implementing a front-facing camera with an infrared module that senses 3D space in the iPhone 8 handset.

This system could be used for a range of applications including, snapping a selfie that would be added to an augmented world, facial recognition or iris scanning.

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 The camera in the iPhone 7 Plus was deemed the ‘future of photography’ – but the technology set for the 10th-anniversary is said to be ‘revolutionary’ (pictured is an artist impression of the iPhone 8 smartphone)

LATEST RUMOR 

The latest rumor regarding Apple’s iPhone suggests it will have a front-facing camera and infrared module that senses 3D space. 

The sensors in the phone are said to detect the location and depth of objects around it. 

The complete 3D system would send invisible IR light signals out from the phone and then wait for them to hit objects and return using the 1.4 megapixel IR receiver. 

The camera would be used for a range of applications including, placing the user’s face on a character in a game, facial recognition, iris scanning and overall improved selfies.

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Has the iPhone Met It’s Match?

iPhone facing its biggest threat yet with the launch of new Samsung Galaxy which could be controlled by the eyes

 

The iPhone is to face its biggest challenge for supremacy in the smartphone market this week with the launch of the new Samsung Galaxy.

In what has been described as the most eagerly awaiting technology release of the year, the Galaxy S4 will be unveiled in New York on Wednesday and rumors are the device will feature eye control.

The S4’s predecessor, the S3, already had a feature called Smart Stay that detected if users were looking at the screen.

The Samsung S4 is set to launch on Wednesday in New York with rumoured features such as wireless charging and eye-controlled scrolling
The Samsung S4 is set to launch on  Wednesday in New York with rumoured features such as wireless charging and  eye-controlled scrolling

But the S4 is expected to have revolutionary functions such as ‘eye pause’ and ‘eye scroll’, which will let users scroll around apps and websites simply by moving their eyes.

Since its launch last year, the S3 briefly outsold the iPhone 4S but after the release of the iPhone 5, Apple have regained the top spot.

However, the S4 is predicted to become the biggest seller when it hits the stores in a few weeks thanks to rumored technological improvements such as wireless charging,

It is also expected to be powered by an eight core processing chip, compared to the iPhone’s two, and to have a larger screen – 5in compared to 4.8in on the S3.

There was fierce competition between Apple's iPhone 4s, left, and Samsung's Galaxy S III, right as the battle between the two technology companies continues
 There was fierce competition between Apple’s  iPhone 4s, left, and Samsung’s Galaxy S III, right, last year as the battle  between the two technology companies continues

Other leaks suggest it will have a 13  megapixel camera, as opposed to the iPhone’s eight.

Francisco Jeronimo, from technology analysis firm IDC, said: ‘Apple is not the one leading the market. I wouldn’t be surprised if the new Samsung device sells more than the new Apple device over the next two years.’

The S4’s launch ceremony will be held at the famous Radio City music Hall and will be broadcast live in Times Square.

South Korean electronics giant Samsung have released a few teaser advertisements for the phone, which show a boy’s face being lit up by a golden glow as he opens a box containing the S4, with the catchline ‘one of the most amazing products to hit the market since TVs went  color.’

Attribution: Rebecca Evans, Daily Mail

A Battery Breakthrough

Charge your iPhone in five SECONDS

 

Researchers have revealed a radical new type  of battery that could charge a mobile phone or even a car in seconds.

Called micro-scale graphene-based  supercapacitors, the devices can charge and discharge a hundred to a thousand  times  faster than standard batteries.

Made from a one-atom–thick layer of carbon, can be easily manufactured and readily integrated into gadgets – and could even lead to far smaller phones.

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The micro-supercapacitors the team created using a DVD burner. They can charge and discharge upto a thousand times faster than traditional batteries
The micro-supercapacitors the team created using a DVD  burner. They can charge and discharge upto a thousand times faster than  traditional batteries

 

HOW IT WORKS

For any supercapacitor to be  effective, two  separated electrodes have to be positioned so that the  available surface area  between them is maximized.

This allows the  supercapacitor to store a  greater charge.

A previous design stacked the layers  of  graphene serving as electrodes, like the slices of bread on a  sandwich.  However, this didn’t work with electronic cicruits.

In their new design, the researchers  placed  the electrodes side by side using an interdigitated pattern, akin to interwoven  fingers.

This helped to maximize the  accessible  surface area available for each of the two electrodes while  also reducing the  path over which ions in the electrolyte would need to  diffuse.

As a result, the new supercapacitors have  more charge capacity and rate capability than their stacked  counterparts.

The team say their breakthrough could least  to faster charging phones and cars, but also smaller gadgets.

‘The integration of energy-storage units with  electronic circuits is challenging and often limits the  miniaturization of the  entire system,’ said Richard Kaner, who is a professor of materials science and  engineering at UCLA’s Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science.

To develop their new  micro-supercapacitor,  the researchers used a two-dimensional sheet of  carbon, known as graphene,  which only has the thickness of a single atom in the third dimension.

The team also found a way to produce the new  batteries easily – using a standard DVD burner.

‘Traditional methods for the  fabrication of  micro-supercapacitors involve labor-intensive  lithographic techniques that have  proven difficult for building  cost-effective devices, thus limiting their  commercial application,’  El-Kady said.

‘Instead, we used a consumer-grade  LightScribe DVD burner to produce graphene micro-supercapacitors over  large  areas at a fraction of the cost of traditional devices.

‘Using this technique, we have been  able to  produce more than 100 micro-supercapacitors on a single disc in  less than 30  minutes, using inexpensive materials.’

For a supercapacitor battery to be  effective, two separated electrodes have to be positioned so that the  available surface area between them is maximized.

This allows the  supercapacitor to store a  greater charge.

A previous design stacked the layers  of  graphene serving as electrodes, like the slices of bread on a  sandwich.  However, this didn’t work with electronic cicruits.

The new breakthrough could also dramatically change the design of batteries, making then far smaller, and easier to built into gadgets
The new breakthrough could also dramatically change the  design of batteries, making then far smaller, and easier to built into  gadgets

 

In their new design, the researchers  placed  the electrodes side by side using an interdigitated pattern, akin to interwoven  fingers.

This helped to maximize the  accessible  surface area available for each of the two electrodes while  also reducing the  path over which ions in the electrolyte would need to  diffuse.

As a result, the new supercapacitors have  more charge capacity and rate capability than their stacked  counterparts.

The researchers say people could even make  the technology at home.

‘The process is straightforward,  cost-effective and can be done at home,’ El-Kady said.

‘One only needs a DVD burner and graphite  oxide dispersion in water, which is  commercially available at a moderate  cost.’

The team say they are now hoping to begin  working with gadget makers.

‘We are now looking for industry partners to  help us mass-produce our graphene micro-supercapacitors,’ Kaner said

Attribution: Mail Online

No More Touchscreen Errors

A cure for sausage fingers: Clip-on tips which spell an end to smartphone typos

Do your fat fingers mean you make embarrassing spelling mistakes when you tap out a text on your phone?

If so, help is – literally – at hand, in the  form of supplementary tips for your fingers.

The new accessory, called Tech Tips, come in  different sizes to fit on to fingertips of any width and even over thick gloves – providing perfect contact with phones and tablets.

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Touching moment: Fat-fingered texters can save their blushes with a fingertip extension that makes using a touchscreen much easier

Fat-fingered texters can save their  blushes with a fingertip extension that makes using a touchscreen much  easierThe product, available in packs of  four  priced $9.99 (£6.30) from www.usetechtips.com, proved a hit at the Consumer  Electronic Show 2013 in Las Vegas.

And they’re already being snapped up  by  touchscreen phone and tablet users from around the world struggling  to get to  grips with the technology.

The creation is the brainchild of Sri Vellanki, who came up with the idea after finding it tough to use her  iPhone  with long fingernails.

 

phone gloves
If you don’t fancy the Tech Tips on the end of your  fingers, you can buy gloves that are specially made to interact with your  smartphone’s touchscreen

Ms Vellanki, originally from India but now  living in Montana, USA, said: ‘I got my first iPhone in 2011 and I was having  problems because it always had to make skin contact and my nails didn’t  work.

‘I thought I could make an electrically  conductive nail polish and easily fix the problem but it turned out to be more  complicated than that.

‘So I figured out what had to be done to make  a very small stylus that was comfortable, economical and extremely  accurate.

‘I had a working prototype based on guitar  fingerpick within a month and it took me about a year from that point to get the  first Tech Tips styluses manufactured.

‘I used a mechanical engineering firm to help  bring my prototype into a product that could be manufactured  easily.

‘I had 3D prototypes done to make sure that  Tech Tips were comfortable and made to fit different sized hands, from those of  a young child to a large man.

‘We even have large enough sizes to fit over  a glove so that you can actually text without taking your glove off. There are  six sizes from XS to XXL.

‘So far we have had loads of interest and a  fantastic response at the Consumer Electronic Show 2013 in January which is  where we launched our products.

‘Everyone from large retailers, educational  institutions and large corporations showed significant interest.

She added: ‘The nail had to look nice, I  didn’t want women to have to compromise.’

Attribution: Kate Bevan

 

Talk About Something Old, Something New

For the mobile gadget enthusiast who nonetheless loves to have that period look at home, one U.S. designer has come up with the ultimate iPhone dock.

The iPhone Gramophone borrows the iconic analogue horn speaker from the earliest sound playback devices and uses it to amplify the sound from Apple gadgets’ speakers.

Simply place your iPad or iPhone in the solid walnut base and the metal horn will boost the volume of the gadget’s speakers by three or four times – with no need for electricity.

The retro device is the brainchild of Matt Richmond, a San Francisco-based furniture designer who built the original prototype from a Twenties horn speaker bought from an East Bay antiques shop.

‘I found this old Victrola horn that had a shape I really loved, and I thought, “How cool would it be if I could use this with my phone?”,’ he said.

‘I held up my phone to the opening on the speaker, and I could immediately tell it was something that would work.’

Taking a heavy piece of hardwood, Mr Richmond carved a hole for the horn, a slot for his phone, and a channel to connect the two.

The result was a elegant but functional iPhone speaker dock, with no battery or plug required.

The nascent product needed little in the way of marketing: everyone who saw Mr Richmond’s original device wanted one of their own and soon, after word reached the internet, he had more orders than he could hope to fill.

So Mr Richmond refined his designs and teamed up with luxury brand Restoration Hardware to bring his product to a wider audience.

Compatibility: The solid walnut base of the retail version of the Gramophone accepts all iPhone models - the new connector on the iPhone 5 poses no technical problems for its iron and brass hornWith a base hand-crafted from solid  walnut, the Gramophone accepts all iPhone models – the new connector on the  iPhone 5 poses no technical problems for its iron and brass horn
Inspired: The retro device is the brainchild of Matt Richmond, a San Francisco-based furniture designer who built the original prototype from a Twenties horn speaker bought from an East Bay antiques shopThe retro device is the brainchild of Matt  Richmond, a San Francisco-based furniture designer who built the original  prototype from a Twenties horn speaker bought from an East Bay antiques shop

With a base hand-crafted from solid walnut, the retail version of the iPhone Gramophone accepts all iPhone models – the new connector on the iPhone 5 poses no technical problems for its iron and brass horn.

Like Mr Richmond’s original prototype it needs no electricity or batteries, and so can be used wherever its owner bothers to heft it.

However, its old-school amplification technology means its not for head bangers.

‘It’s not overpowering, so it’s great in the background,’ Mr Richmond said. ‘And it’s directional – you can point the horn  where you want the sound. If you put it in a corner it’ll really fill a room.’

The iPhone Gramophone is available online from Restoration Hardware for $249.

Attribution: Damien Gayle