Economics of Bacon and Natural Disasters

by: the Common Constitutionalist

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You may have noticed that the price of bacon is off the charts. I know I have. It appears to have basically doubled in the last months. Why?

It’s simple – supply and demand. Over the last few year demand for everything bacon has skyrocketed. It seems bacon is in everything. There is Maple Bacon ice cream for dogs. There are bacon cream Oreos, bacon flavored gumballs, bacon mayonnaise, bacon toothpaste and Amazon sells Lester’s bacon soda. I love bacon, but ick!

In February, Business Insider explained the effect the demand for bacon has had on the industry.

The country’s supply of frozen pork belly — the meat used to make bacon — fell from 53.4 million pounds in December 2015 to 17.8 million pounds in December 2016. That’s the lowest level the nation’s pork reserve has been at since 1957, according to US Department of Agriculture data. “Today’s pig farmers are setting historic records by producing more pigs than ever,” Rich Deaton, the president of the Ohio Pork Council, said in a statement highlighting the data. “Yet our reserves are still depleting.”

What we’re witnessing are naturally occurring market forces at work – basic economics – supply and demand, and why the cost of bacon has increased so much. As demand outstrips supply, prices naturally increase. If it didn’t, soon there would be no supply left. The free market, left to its own devices, devoid of government meddling, will then re-balance itself, allowing supply to catch up with demand. Bacon will then return to more reasonable prices.

Put it this way. You go to store to purchase something. For this scenario, it doesn’t matter what it is. Luckily, you happen upon a store offering the product at 50% off. Why? read more

Disaster-Proof Pod

Inventor to test new escape ‘ship’ by going over Niagara falls

 

A British inventor has made a ‘tsunami survival’ capsule, and is to test it by going over Niagara Falls.

Aerospace engineer Julian Sharpe, 50, believes his disaster-proof pod will save people from tidal waves, tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes and super storms.

And he is so confident of the life-saving aluminium ball that he will ride it down the world-famous 167ft waterfall.

Survival: Former Boeing engineer Julian Shape has designed a pod which will keep people safe during natural disasters including tsunamis and hurricanes
Former Boeing engineer Julian Shape has designed a pod which will keep people safe during natural disasters including tsunamis and hurricanes

He said: ‘We can tell people how strong it is, but until you’ve proved that it’s saved a life they might not believe you.’

Mr Sharpe claims the sphere will protect him from the massive impact, which will be similar to being rear ended by a car at about 20 mph.

He believes the capsule will keep people safe in natural disasters, such as the tsunamis which hit Thailand and Japan.

In a tsunami the main danger is not drowning in the fast flowing water but being crushed by the debris which is swept along.

He said: ‘Since it’s a sphere, when you do run into something it’s just going to glance off.

‘In most cases, you’re probably going to be a bit lighter than those objects so those objects will just go along their way and kind of move you.’

Drop: Mr Sharpe is to prove how strong the pod is by going over Niagara Falls
 Mr Sharpe is to prove how strong the pod is by going over Niagara Falls

Mr Sharpe was born in Carmarthern, West Wales, but now lives in Seattle in the United States.

The former Boeing engineer has taken his prototypes to the Yokohama Expo in Kanagawa, Japan, and sponsors have commissioned further production.

Now Mr Sharpe and his business partners are hoping to sell different models of the capsule for between $990 and $4950.

Disaster: British search and rescue teams on the ground in Ofunato, Japan, where they were flown in to help search for survivors of the county's biggest earthquake and subsequent tsunami in 2011
British search and rescue teams on the ground in Ofunato, Japan, where they were flown in to help search for survivors of the county’s biggest earthquake and subsequent tsunami in 2011

He claims the capsule will keep up to six people safe for several hours while it is buffeted by a Tsunami’s powerful wave.

He said: ‘After the tsunami in Japan, we decided we had to develop it and get it out there for the masses.

‘There are 135 countries worldwide exposed to the tsunami wave.

‘If you can save one life, it would be worth producing it.’

Attribution: James Rush

Relocation

It’s a local bar with a difference – the  difference being its locality.

Welcome to Sandy’s Bar, not at the end of the street but plonked right in the middle.

Just days ago this was part of The Sugar Bowl, summer hangout at Breezy Point’s shore. Until it was ripped from its  moorings by Hurricane Sandy and delivered to Gerritsen Beach, according to the  people living there.

Incredible: The Sugar Bowl bar was swept for seven miles from the Breezy Point area of New York to this location in Gerritsen BeachThe Sugar Bowl bar was swept for seven miles  from the Breezy Point area of New York to this location in Gerritsen Beach
How it used to look: The Sugar Bowl in Breezy Point before its extraordinary journey. It turned up in Gerritsen Beach complete with tables and chairs, shot glasses and an impressively stocked barHow it used to look: The Sugar Bowl in Breezy Point  before its extraordinary journey. It turned up in Gerritsen Beach complete with  tables and chairs, shot glasses and an impressively stocked bar

An incredible journey of around seven miles,  across the bay and made even more remarkable by the fact that it turned up  complete with tables and chairs, shot glasses and an impressively stocked  bar.

With its clapboard walls and freshly painted window sills it looks like something straight out of The Wizard of Oz.

Little wonder one local speculated that it  had been picked up by the wind and dropped where it sat on Madoc Street, Gerritsen Beach.

In fact one man knew exactly what had  happened.

Astonishing: The Sugar Bowl floated into Gerritsen Beach on floodwaters, ending up in the middle of a street. Locals quickly renamed it 'Sandy's Bar'The Sugar Bowl floated into Gerritsen Beach  on floodwaters, ending up in the middle of a street. Locals quickly renamed it  ‘Sandy’s Bar’
Intact: The building's interior remained in remarkably good condition despite the extraordinary seven-mile journey The building’s interior remained in remarkably  good condition despite the extraordinary seven-mile journey
Venue: Gerritsen Beach resident Lawrence Lowey enjoys a beer in the abandoned bar which turned up in the middle of his street Gerritsen Beach resident Lawrence Lowey enjoys a beer in the abandoned bar which turned up in the middle of his street
Surprise: The residents of Gerritsen Beach could hardly believe their luck when a readily available supply of alcohol floated into their neighborhoodThe residents of Gerritsen Beach could hardly believe their luck when a readily available supply of alcohol floated into their neighborhood
Refreshments: Some of the drinks found in the bar when the Sugar Bowl turned up in Gerritsen Beach Some of the drinks found in the bar when  the Sugar Bowl turned up in Gerritsen Beach
Party time: Residents of Gerritsen Beach, Brooklyn, hooked up a generator and had fun when they found the bar was fully stockedResidents of Gerritsen Beach, Brooklyn, took the opportunity to have a break from the misery when they found the bar was fully stocked
Having a drink: Some of the revellers who enjoyed themselves when the Sugar Bowl washed up in Gerritsen Beach, Brooklyn Some of the revellers who enjoyed  themselves when the Sugar Bowl washed up in Gerritsen Beach, Brooklyn

Charlie Coppolino, 42, witnessed the arrival  of the bar, thought to be a portion of The Sugar Bowl that wasn’t flattened by  the storm.

He said: ‘I looked out my bedroom window and  I saw what looked like a house just flying past. The water must have been five,  six feet deep.

‘I said, “Ma we’re in trouble!’ It came in  Jamaica Bay and smashed my gazebo, through my gate, ran over a car and just went  down the road about five miles an hour like a steamroller.’

Cycling up to where the bar sat askew Lawrence Lowey, a resident of Gerritsen for 17 years joked, ‘I told  them to  park my bar and look where they put it. You can’t get the help.’

According to resident Billy Gooch, ‘All of us  here, we’d had the panic we’d been  through hell and the day after the storm  we’d worked all day to save  what we could.

Journey: This illustration shows how the bar was swept out into the water from its original location in Breezy Point before being washed up at Gerritsen Beach, Brooklyn. Witnesses said it was travelling in floodwater up to six feet deepThis illustration shows how the bar was swept  out into the water from its original location in Breezy Point before being  washed up at Gerritsen Beach, Brooklyn. Witnesses said it was travelling in  floodwater up to six feet deep
Renamed: The revellers called the bar 'Sandy's Bar' after the superstorm and marked 'BYOB' on the side of it to instruct guests to bring their own bottles when the drink ran out...The revellers called the bar ‘Sandy’s Bar’  after the superstorm and marked ‘BYOB’ on the side of it to instruct guests to  bring their own bottles when the drink ran out…
...but the fun couldn't last forever, and the police ordered for the bar to be demolished and cleared away…but the fun couldn’t last forever, and the police ordered for the bar to be demolished and cleared away
Condemned: The digger reduces the venue to a pile of debris under police directionThe digger reduces the venue to a pile of  debris under police direction
Fun over: Partygoer Michael Farrell stands in front of the debris after police ordered for the bar to be demolished Partygoer Michael Farrell stands in front of  the debris after police ordered for the bar to be demolished

‘There’s this bar – it’s got Hennessy,  Captain Morgans, 12 year old Maclallan, vodka and cases of Heineken…well what  were we going to do? We had a party. We needed to let off steam.’

Once stocks ran out the bar, believed to be  the Sugar Shack part of the Sugar Bowl bar, operated a strict Bring Your Own  Bottle policy.

It turned out to be a last hoorah for the  bar. By late afternoon the police had turned up.

Believing  they were there to remove a  fibre glass boat they were initially utterly bemused by what they  found.

But ultimately, and to boos from the  good-natured locals, they called time on The Sugar Bowl/Sandy’s Bar, breaking it  up and clearing it away.

Destruction: The Breezy Point area of New York was devastated by Superstorm Sandy, with flooding and fires wrecking homes and businessesThe Breezy Point area of New York was  devastated by Superstorm Sandy, with flooding and fires wrecking homes and  businesses

Attribution: Laura Collins and Daniel Bates

Storm Damage

Almost one week after superstorm Sandy struck the East Coast with its ferocious force, power was still out to some 2.5 million customers due to  damages, down from 3.5 million on Friday, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office  of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability claimed.

Tthe state with the largest number of outages by far is still New Jersey with 32 percent of customers without power, it said it a report.

And as the lights begin to flicker on in Lower Manhattan, nine percent of customers across the state of New York still do not have power, followed by seven percent in Connecticut.

Artist Konstantin Bokov gets water to boil for drinking from an old fire hrydrant at Rockaway Beach, New York on November 3, 2012. He has no power, and no running waterArtist Konstantin Bokov gets water to boil for drinking  from an old fire hrydrant at Rockaway Beach, New York on November 3, 2012. He  has no power, and no running water
What remains: Julie Traina tries to recover some personal items from the destroyed home of her parents in Staten Island yesterdayJulie Traina tries to recover some  personal items from the destroyed home of her parents in Staten Island
Vigilante justice: A sign is seen outside a home in Long Beach in Long Island on November 2 gives a dire warning to would-be looters  A sign is seen outside a home in Long Beach in Long Island on November 2 gives a dire warning to would-be looters
Under protection: A warning message seen written on a door to keep away looters in a street in Freeport, Long Island as they try to return to normalcy following the hurricane A warning message seen written on a  door to keep away looters in a street in Freeport, Long Island as they try to return to normalcy following the hurricane
Wild west: People walk through the heavily damaged Rockaway neighborhood in Queens where a large section of the iconic boardwalk was washed away People walk through the heavily damaged  Rockaway neighborhood in Queens where a large section of the iconic boardwalk was washed away
The hunger games: Two women look into the window of a flooded deli while searching for food in Coney Island, four days after SandyTwo women look into the window of a  flooded deli while searching for food in Coney Island, four days after Sandy
Aid: A boy watches as members of the U.S. Army National Guard unload food and supplies in the Rockaways section of Queens  A boy watches as members of the U.S. Army National Guard unload food and supplies in the Rockaways section of Queens

This comes as residents of the Rockaways in Queens continued to struggle without power, heat or food for a sixth day as their neighborhood slowly descended into chaos.

‘It’s chaos; it’s pandemonium out here,’ said Chris Damon, who had been waiting for 3.5 hours at the site and had circled the block five times. “It seems like nobody has any answers.”

Added Damon: ‘I feel like a victim of Hurricane Katrina. I never thought it could happen here in New York, but it’s happened.’

With little police presence on the storm-ravaged streets, many residents of the peninsula have been forced to take their protection into their own hands, arming themselves with guns, baseball bats and even bows and arrows to ward off thugs seeking to loot their  homes.

It has been reported that crooks have been disguising themselves as Long Island Power Authority workers and coming by homes on the peninsula in the middle of the night while real utility workers were nowhere to be found.

‘We booby-trapped our door and keep a baseball bat beside our bed,’ Danielle Harris, 34, told the New York Daily News.

The woman added that she has been hearing gunshots likely fired in the nearby housing project for three nights in a row.

Meanwhile, local surfer Keone Singlehurst said that he stockpiled knives, a machete and a bow and arrow.

‘I would take a looter with a bow if a felt threatened I would definitely use it,’ he said. ‘It’s like the wild west. A borderline lawless situation.’

City Councilman James Sanders said he fears that things are going to get even worse.

‘We have an explosive mix here,’ he said.  ‘People will take matters into their own hands.’

Sanders has directed much of his anger and frustration at LIPA, calling on the City Council to investigate the utility for ignoring the Rockaways for so long.

‘LIPA has failed the people of the Rockaways,’ he said. ‘It’s a question of class… serving the richer areas of Long Island and ignoring the Rockaways.’

Barbecue: Collins Wimbish cooks food over a fire in a barrel in the Rockaways neighborhood of Queens Collins Wimbish cooks food over a fire in a  barrel in the Rockaways neighborhood of Queens
Keeping in touch: People charge cell phones at a police generator in RockawaysPeople charge cell phones at a police generator in Rockaways
Destroyed: This Rockaways boardwalk that was pushed off of its pilings by storm surge This Rockaways boardwalk that was pushed off  of its pilings by storm surge
Making do: Large areas of New York outside Manhattan are still without power or functioning stores to buy food and water following Hurricane Sandy Large areas of New York outside Manhattan are still without power or functioning stores to buy food and water following  Hurricane Sandy
Ruins: A silhouetted man walks past a strip of destroyed buildings in Rockaways  A silhouetted man walks past a strip of destroyed  buildings in Rockaways
Reception: A man makes a phone call next to discarded storm garbage in Coney Island FridayA man makes a phone call next to discarded storm garbage in Coney Island Friday

Walter Meyer, 37, told the Daily News that the Rockaways of today bears little resemblance to the peaceful place where he has surfed so many times in the past.

Shooting looters: A toy dog wearing a military helmet sits atop a car holding a sing warning off looters in a resident's driveway in the Rockaways A toy dog wearing a military helmet sits atop a car holding a sing warning off looters in a resident’s driveway in the Rockaways

‘After sunset everyone locks their doors,’ he  said. ‘They’re trying to find whatever weapons they can find. Some people are even using bows and arrows.’

Along with mounting safety concerns,  homeowners in the beachfront community hit hard by Hurricane Sandy, that have left 109 dead, continued to face hunger, complaining that federal officials have left them to fend for themselves.

‘Rockaways always get left over,’ said Meyer. ‘It’s treated like a marginalized land in the city.’

Most of the grocery stores in the area have not reopened since the storm, and the neighborhood has been left cut off from the rest of the city, with no trains or even shuttle buses servicing the residents.

Stranded neighbors largely have been relying on volunteers delivering food, water and other basic necessities while the Red Cross and FEMA were still nowhere in sight.

‘We can’t exist,’ said Ann Manning. ‘We can’t buy milk. We can’t buy cereal. We can’t buy nothing.’

As they scrape around desperately for food and are forced to use their gas to keep warm, many claim they are the forgotten victims of Sandy.

The Borough President of Staten Island called the reaction of Red Cross –  or lack thereof – to the devastation caused by Sandy an ‘absolute  disgrace’.

Destruction: Marina Sverdlov talks to a real estate broker while standing in her flood ravaged home in Staten Island Marina Sverdlov talks to a real estate  broker while standing in her flood ravaged home in Staten Island
No safe harbor: Boats pushed up by Hurricane Sandy lie against residences next to a marina on in Staten Island as a man walks his dogBoats pushed up by Hurricane Sandy lie against residences next to a marina on Staten Island as a man walks his  dog
Bitter: A sign about the marathon and New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is displayed in a devastated section of Staten Island yesterday, before the marathon was canceled  A sign about the marathon and New York City  Mayor Michael Bloomberg is displayed in a devastated section of Staten Island, before the marathon was canceled
Relief: People eat soup at a donation and distribution center in the Rockaways, though residents are complaining there is not enough assistance for them People eat soup at a donation and distribution  center in the Rockaways, though residents are complaining there is not enough assistance for them
Survival: Emilio Langilotti of Staten Island carries food from a FEMA and American Red Cross aid and disaster relief station in the boroughEmilio Langilotti of Staten Island carries food from a FEMA and American Red Cross aid and disaster relief station in the borough

James Molinaro went as far as to tell people not to donate to the charity because when push came to shove, the group just didn’t deliver when Staten Island needed them the most.

He’s remained there ever since the hurricane struck and gave his first-hand account of the devastation.

‘It’s so bad here, a lot worse than how its being portrayed by the media.,’  he said.

‘They are finding bodies left and right, elderly people who don’t even watch the news or who knew the storm was coming. I was just with one of my best friends from high school and college, and his house is completely gone.

‘I know this island in and out. To see it completely destroyed is bizarre.

‘I’ve been trying to hit every shelter on Staten Island to do what I can,  just to make people smile. A lot of people know me and know I’m from here.’

‘My advice to the people of Staten Island is  do not donate to the American Red Cross,’ said Mr Molinaro. ‘Let them get their  money elsewhere.’

‘It’s an absolute disgrace in a county that has always responded to disasters all over the world,’ he said.

‘Katrina – we sent them down four trailer loads of food, water and one trailer load of generators. No one’s responding to us.’

Residents are pleading for help as they fear their devastated neighborhoods are being ignored.

In a Coney Island apartment block, where tenants huddle together in one room and human waste spills out of the toilet, tenant Jeffery Francis despairs that help is not getting to Brooklyn faster.

‘We are scavenging for food like animals,’ he  told the New York Daily News. ‘We are in a crisis and no one will help us. Look at us. We are misery. Everyone cares about Manhattan. No one is looking out for us. Nothing.’

At another apartment where power is still out, residents are out of food and praying for help. Albert Miller, 58, told the paper: ‘One person found a sandwich and we split it four ways.’

While power was likely returned to Manhattan’s East and West Villages, Financial District, Chelsea, Chinatown and the Lower East Side by the weekend, according to the power company, Con Edison, outages in Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island are not expected to be repaired for another week.

Across Staten Island residents are also increasingly frustrated they are being passed over while other parts of  New York and New Jersey receive aid and attention.

Residents were furious the island was being prepared as the starting line for Sunday’s marathon, while hundreds are left hungry and one resident there told CBS station WCBS, ‘We’re gonna die! We’re gonna freeze! We’ve got 90-year-old people without homes in the wake of the superstorm!’

Natvel Pritchard, of Staten Island, told CBS  News, ‘Though people don’t talk about Staten Island much, people are here, a lot of people are hurting, so it’s upsetting.’

Crossings: Alexandra Lopez, 7, looks out the window of the Staten Island Ferry on November 2Alexandra Lopez, 7, looks out the window of  the Staten Island Ferry on November 2
Two worlds: The half of the Verrazano Narrows Bridge attached to Brooklyn is lit while the half attached to Staten Island is dark last night The half of the Verrazano Narrows Bridge  attached to Brooklyn is lit while the half attached to Staten Island is dark last night

Homes across Brooklyn and Coney Island are some of the worst hit in the wake of the superstorm.

Many houses shattered into piles of bricks and splintered planks at Coney Island, while others stand waterlogged and abandoned.

What's left: Mounds of debris can be seen in the massively damaged Rockaway neighborhoodMounds of debris can be seen in the massively damaged Rockaway neighborhood
Damages: Jeff Kulikowski sits on a bench on the boardwalk that was pushed off of its pilings by storm surge in the RockawaysJeff Kulikowski sits on a bench on the boardwalk that was pushed off of its pilings by storm surge in the Rockaways

One gated community at the tip of the island, Seagate, was particularly badly hit, with some houses entirely washed away or flattened.

For power companies, the scale of destruction was unmatched – more widespread than any blizzard or ice storm and worse than the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

‘It’s unprecedented: fallen trees, debris, the roads, water, snow. It’s a little bit of everything,’ said Brian Wolff, senior vice president of the Edison Electric Institute, a group that lobbies for utilities.

Initially, about 60 million people were without power in 8.2 million homes and businesses.

By Wednesday night, that number had fallen to roughly 44 million people in 6 million households and businesses and today around 3.6 million are without power.

Stacked: Boats piled up on top of one another near Beach Haven Inlet on the New Jersey coastline. Residents outside of New York City believe they are being passed over while aid is directed to ManhattanBoats piled up on top of one another near Beach Haven Inlet on the New Jersey coastline. Residents in New York’s outer boroughs, and elsewhere outside the city, believe they are being passed over while aid is directed to Manhattan
Destruction: Homes in the Sea Gate part of Brooklyn have been ripped apart by the superstormHomes in the Seagate part of Brooklyn have been ripped apart by the superstorm
Ruin: Whole walls and roofs of homes in Sea Gate, Brooklyn, were destroyed by the stormWhole walls and roofs of homes in Seagate,  Brooklyn, were destroyed by the storm
Areas of New York and New Jersey are still without power days after Hurricane Sandy hit the East Coast of America
Attribution: Mail Online

Saved by Sandy?

by: the Common Constitutionalist

The following article in no way makes light of the tragic situation people find themselves in due to hurricane Sandy. The loss of life and property is horrible. For the loved ones I have in the effected areas, I wish you all the best.

Our beloved president may have been spared the humiliation of being thrown overboard by the liberal progressive commie establishment.

Hurricane Sandy, created of course, by the republican’s secret weather machine, may have inadvertently saved Barack Hussein Obama.

See, liberal ideas or policies can never be to blame for any election loss. I’m certain the liberal powers-that-be were all set to toss King Barack off his throne and under the proverbial bus. It was his fault, not liberal ideas. He just didn’t or couldn’t get the great collective message out. Heck, he only had four years.

No man (or god) will be allowed to shake the foundation of liberalism, not even the “Anointed One”.

But now hurricane Sandy has possibly bailed out Barack.

Alex Guillen of Politico floated the trial balloon this past Monday, of the possibility of postponing the election, despite it never being done before.

Not for any previous natural disaster. Not even for any war including the Civil War, in which, in 1864, President Abraham Lincoln acknowledged that the scheduled elections, “added not a little to the strain” of the ongoing struggle, but postponement was not an option. “We cannot have free government without elections; and if the rebellion could force us to forego or postpone a national election, it might fairly claim to have already conquered and ruined us.” Lincoln further noted that keeping to schedule “demonstrated that a people’s government can sustain a national election, in the midst of a great civil war. Until now it has not been known to the world that this was a possibility.”

That same day (Oct. 29), the White House cheer squad (press corps) asked Obama spokes boy, Jay Carney, “Jay, some of the utilities are saying that the power is going to be out in some areas for up to ten days. That would obviously include Election Day. Is there any contingency planning to alter the Election Day schedule because of this?”

The mainstream will, of course, do whatever it can to secure victory for their man.

On it’s face, this strategy makes no sense. It is completely illogical, but when it comes to the thinking of the left, logic has no place.

What possible gain could be had by postponing an election where only a few states, 2 in particular, were drastically effected? Those two states being New Jersey and New York, which Obama will win anyway.

But this is not the strategy at all. The democrat operatives in Washington no full well that the election will not postponed or changed in any way.

I’m betting, through internal polling and other sources, the liberal elites know Obama will most likely lose this election and may lose big.

Rather than accept the failure of policy, they must somehow create a situation on which to blame the loss.

Much as the liberals did 2000, they must also form a narrative of the election being stolen.

I’m quite sure they don’t favor throwing Obama under the bus, but if it must be done to save liberal ideology, so be it.

It will be much easier to now blame, at least partially, the election loss on the storm.

But the storm only severely effected a few states. How can that be to blame?

Several national polls have just been released showing Obama now winning key battleground states, such as Ohio. Never mind the polls are crap, but they still show Obama ahead.

Obama has suspended his campaign for a few days to actually play president. First time for everything, I know. He’s not really doing anything, but it has that appearance, none the less.

Those on the left, including all the mainstream press, will cry foul, that he, the president had to attend to the business of running the country, while that scum, Mitt Romney doesn’t have to concern himself with such things and can just campaign to his heart’s content, giving Romney the decided advantage. This, among other things, caused Obama to lose.

There will also be the predictable cry of cheating republicans, voters disenfranchised and discrimination due to new voter I.D. laws. The international observers will raise objection to something and lawsuits will follow.

One way or another, Romney will be said to be illegitimate; selected not elected. Sound familiar?

The only way to prevent most of this from occurring is a Romney landslide victory. We will never eradicate all the malfeasance of the left, but a clear and concise victory will quell most of the whining.

And as uncharitable as it may sound (and it is), it would please me greatly to see Obama get tossed in the trash heap of history by those same sycophants who have been fawning over him for years.