A Father Takes a Stand Against the Culture of Death

by: the Common Constitutionalist

I’m sure most of us remember the heart-wrenching saga of Terri Schiavo in Florida. In March of 2005, Terri, after doctors pronounced her to be in a permanent vegetative state, despite the fact that she required no life support in the form of breathing tubes or such, her estranged and total bag of crap husband petitioned for and received permission from a judge to pull her feeding and hydration tube so he could collect on her insurance policy. It took 13 days for Terri to finally succumb in rather agonizing fashion. This past March, on the tenth anniversary of her death, Rush Limbaugh declared her death “the day our country hit rock bottom.”

Despite Terri’s family’s willingness to take her home and care for her, the judge still granted the gruesome death sentence. It reminds me of a couple of articles I wrote in 2013 entitled, “Grim Reaper on Wheels” and “Euthanasia Isn’t a Death Penalty…Apparently.”

In them I chronicled the rise of roving death squads in the Netherlands which traveled the countryside euthanizing its citizens and that the practice was gaining traction in other European countries. The Dutch government’s view was that for some who, according to authorities, were suffering – it was for the sufferer’s own good and the good of society. In 2013, “1 in 30 deaths in the Netherlands are [were] from euthanasia.” As of 2013, Holland had six full time “Death Squads.” read more

Grim Reaper on Wheels

by: the Common Constitutionalist

 

For decades the Dutch government has been trying to extradite a war criminal from Germany. His name is Klaas Faber and he was a young Dutchman when the Nazis overran the Netherlands in 1940.

 

Faber was quick to embrace the Nazi way and volunteered to join the infamous SS. He then enthusiastically moved into the SS Einsatzgruppen (Special Task Force) “roving death squad” that killed countless Dutch Jews, resistance fighters, intellectuals and random Dutch civilians.

 

It’s interesting that the Dutch government would think Mr. Faber’s crimes so abhorrent for in 2011 they created a group of professionals tasked with doing something quite similar.

 

In 2011 Dutch health Minister Edith Schippers admitted that “mobile units” were “for patients who met the criteria for euthanasia but whose doctors are unwilling to carry it out.” Dutch citizens are calling these mobile units “roving death squads” like their SS predecessors. Well, that’s only a little chilling! read more

No Weed in School

So, is this where the United States is headed? With the relaxed stance of many in this country regarding the use of marijuana, I wouldn’t doubt it.

Amsterdam this week became the first city in the Netherlands to ban students from smoking marijuana at school.

The city’s mayor Eberhard van der Laan introduced the law after school chiefs complained about pupils turning up to classes high after rolling up outside the grounds.

Marijuana is widely available in Holland as, although it is technically illegal, police can’t prosecute people for possession of small amounts.

The Netherlands' relaxed drug policy means some youngsters are turning up to classes stoned, prompting a ban of its use near schoolsThe Netherlands’ relaxed drug policy means some youngsters are turning up to classes stoned, prompting a ban of its use near schools

But it has also had the unwanted side effect that Dutch children are frequently exposed to the drug in public areas.

City spokeswoman Iris Reshef says schools have always forbidden pot, but found it difficult to enforce the policy when students smoked on or near campus and challenged administrators to do anything about it.

‘It’s not really what you have in mind as an educator, that children would be turning up for class stoned, or drunk either for that matter,’ she said.

‘But it has been a problem for some schools.’

Tolerance: Amsterdam is known for its 'coffee shops', where marijuana can be purchased and smoked Amsterdam is known for its ‘coffee shops’, where marijuana can be purchased and smoked

After a change in national law, the city will now be able to declare as of January 1 ‘no toking zones’ – areas like schools and playgrounds where weed-smoking is forbidden by law.

The move is closely paired with a decision by the new government to ditch plans for a national ‘weed pass’ that would have blocked tourists from buying marijuana.

That was a measure years in the making, and greatly desired by southern cities such as Maastricht that have been flooded with dealers from Belgium and Germany who drive across the border to buy weed in bulk.

Marijuana has been tolerated in Holland for decades, attracting many tourists who travel there to enjoy the drugMarijuana has been tolerated in Holland for decades, attracting many tourists who travel there to enjoy the drug

But the weed pass was opposed by Amsterdam, where drug tourists are not generally seen as causing many problems.

Last month, Van der Laan proclaimed that coffee shops would stay open for tourists after all.

In a letter Wednesday, he noted that one in three tourists who come to Amsterdam try marijuana while they’re here, more than previously estimated.

Attribution: Sam Webb