Dogs are Smarter than We Think

If you’ve ever wondered why your dog seems to know exactly where you’ve hidden their treats, scientists may have an answer.

Austrian researchers have found canines are clever enough to know when their owner is looking at food – and where they are looking.

They say the discovery shows a previously unproven ability for dogs to see things from their owner’s point of view – a key skill of social intelligence.

Austrian researchers say the discovery shows a previously unproven ability for dogs to see things from their owner's point of view - a key skill of social intelligence.
Austrian researchers say the discovery shows a previously unproven ability for dogs to see things from their owner’s point of view – a key skill of social intelligence.

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Doggy Fountain

Never mind heat wave, how’s this for a brain  wave: an Illinois-based design company has created a paw-activated water  fountain for dogs.

The Doggie Fountain, dubbed Koolinator,  attaches to a standard garden hose and provides thirsty pets with a supply of  fresh running water to help them keep cool in hot weather.

It can also be used in place of a water bowl  to make sure your pets are not left without a drink when you’re at work,  especially with the hot temperatures set to continue.

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An Illinois-based design company has created a paw-activated water fountain for dogs.
An Illinois-based design company has created a  paw-activated water fountain for dogs. The Doggie Fountain, dubbed Koolinator,  pictured, attaches to a standard garden hose and provides thirsty pets with a  supply of fresh running water to help them keep cool in hot weather

 

Once a dog learns to press the Doggie Fountain paddle with their paw, the gadget can be used as a replacement to the water bowl for when owners are at work or out of the house and can't keep the bowl topped up
Once a dog learns to press the Doggie Fountain paddle  with its paw, the gadget can be used to replace a water bowl for when owners are  at work or out of the house and can’t keep the bowl topped up

Allied Precision Industries which invented  the gadget said: ‘Owners can just simply attach the innovative dog water  dispenser to the end of their garden hose.

‘When your dog steps on the paw switch, a  stream of fresh drinking water is released.

‘As a bonus you get to teach your pet a new  trick and once it gets a hang of it you will be free of the task of filling its  water bowl.

‘The dog will finally able to enjoy a cool,  refreshing drink of water whenever it feels like it.’

The Doggie Fountain costs $68 and can be  bought online.

Keep your pooch cool with paw-operated drinking  fountain

Attribution: Victoria Woollaston, Mail Online

Dog Photo of the Year

This soaking dog may not be smiling while peeking out from behind a shower curtain, but maybe it hasn’t heard it’s just received a special mention in the Dog Portrait Gallery.

The picture, taken by Opal Seabrook, was among the best of the Kennel Club Dog Photographer of the Year competition, which has recently announced its winners.

Held annually, the contest is open to both professionals and amateurs, young and old, from all around the world – and this year attracted 5,000 entries.

Got any sham-pooch? This sopping wet hound was given special mention in the Dog Portrait category. It was taken by by Opal SeabrookGot any sham-pooch? This sopping wet hound was given special mention in the Dog Portrait category. It was taken by by Opal Seabrook
Let sleeping dogs lie... awkwardly: Third place runner-up in the Puppies category. Photo taken by Pam LangrishLet sleeping dogs lie… awkwardly: Third place runner-up in the Puppies category. Photo taken by Pam Langrish
This year's overall winner was Catherine Laurenson, from Glasgow, for her photo of a Border Collie On the scent of victory: This year’s overall winner was Catherine Laurenson, from Glasgow, for her photo of a Border Collie
Intense? Sure I can do intense: Second place runner-up in the Dog Portrait category. Photo taken by Jason BanburyIntense? Sure I can do intense: Second place runner-up in the Dog Portrait category. Photo taken by Jason Banbury
Who let the tots out: Second place runner-up in the Man's Best Friend category. Photo taken by Catherine MacGregorWho let the tots out: Second place runner-up in the Man’s Best Friend category. Photo taken by Catherine MacGregor
Sea looks a bit ruff... Winner in the Dogs at Play category. Photo taken by Doug JewellSea looks a bit ruff… Winner in the Dogs at Play category. Photo taken by Doug Jewell
It's spray time: Second place runner-up in the Dogs at Play category. Photo taken by Ben BurfittIt’s spray time: Second place runner-up in the Dogs at Play category. Photo taken by Ben Burfitt
Lots of cows and bow-wow-wows: Second place runner-up in the Dogs at Work category. Photo taken by Jon OakeyLots of cows and bow-wow-wows: Second place runner-up in the Dogs at Work category. Photo taken by Jon Oakey

The competition has six categories: Portrait, Man’s Best Friend; Dogs At Play; Dogs At Work; and I Love Dogs Because – a category specifically for those aged 16 and under. There was also a new category this year, Puppy.

This year’s overall winner was Catherine Laurenson, from Glasgow, for her photo of a Border Collie set against a clear blue sky.

In addition to the new Dog Photographer of the Year trophy, she was awarded a glamorous Uggie collar and lead from Holly & Lil.

The pair’s image will appear on the front cover of the Kennel Gazette and put on display at Discover Dogs and Crufts.

Meanwhile, Jessica Keating, winner of the Under 16 category, will receive a day at Crufts 2013.

The winning images will be on display at Discover Dogs, which takes place at Earls Court, London, on November 10 and 11.

Let leaping dogs fly: Third place runner-up in the 16 and Under category. Photo taken by Joshua CarterLet leaping dogs fly: Third place runner-up in the 16 and Under category. Photo taken by Joshua Carter
And they call it poppy love: Third place runner-up in the Dog Portrait category. Photo taken by Sarah BrownAnd they call it poppy love: Third place runner-up in the Dog Portrait category. Photo taken by Sarah Brown
Bubble and sleek: Winner in the 16 and Under category. Photo taken by Jessica KeatingBubble and sleek: Winner in the 16 and Under category. Photo taken by Jessica Keating
I've got this competition licked: Winner in the Man's Best Friend category. Photo taken by Emma CarterI’ve got this competition licked: Winner in the Man’s Best Friend category. Photo taken by Emma Carter
Now that's setting the dog among the pigeons: Third place runner-up in the Dogs at Play category. Photo taken by Tracey AdamsNow that’s setting the dog among the pigeons: Third place runner-up in the Dogs at Play category. Photo taken by Tracey Adams

WHO’S IN THE LEAD? FULL LIST OF KENNEL CLUB CONTEST WINNERS

Straw dogs: Third place runner-up in the Dogs at Work category. Photo taken by Leanne Graham
Straw dogs: Third place runner-up in the Dogs at Work category. Photo taken by Leanne Graham

Overall Winner: Catherine Laurenson
Dogs at Work (winner): Catherine Laurenson Runner-up (2nd place): Jon Oakey Runner-up (3rd place): Leanne Graham
Dog Portrait (winner): Shane Wilkinson Runner-up (2nd place): Jason Banbury Runner-up (3rd place): Sarah Brown Special Mention: Opal Seabrook
Dogs at Play (winner): Doug Jewell Runner-up (2nd place): Ben Burfitt Runner-up (3rd place): Tracey Adams
Puppies (winner): Rhian White Runner-up (2nd place): Tracey Jarvis Runner-up (3rd place): Pam Langrish
Man’s Best Friend (winner): Emma Carter Runner-up (2nd place): Catherine MacGregor Runner-Up (3rd place): Sarah Brown
I Love Dogs Because… (winner): Jessica Keating (16 years and under) Runner-up (2nd place): Conor O’ Beolain Runner-up (3rd place): Joshua Carter

How does your garden... growl? Winner in the Puppies category. Photo taken by Rhian WhiteHow does your garden… growl? Winner in the Puppies category. Photo taken by Rhian White
I'm a puppy... get me out of here! Second place runner-up in the Puppies category. Photo taken by Tracey JarvisI’m a puppy… get me out of here! Second place runner-up in the Puppies category. Photo taken by Tracey Jarvis

Best buddies forever: Third place runner-up in the Man's Best Friend category. Photo taken by Sarah BrownBest buddies forever: Third place runner-up in the Man’s Best Friend category. Photo taken by Sarah Brown

Reflections in the forest: Winner in the Dog Portrait category, taken by Shane WilkinsonReflections in the forest: Winner in the Dog Portrait category, taken by Shane Wilkinson
Attribution: Mail Online

Empathetic Canines

Your dog might understand you more than you think.

It appears dogs can ‘catch’ yawns from humans – but it seems to work best when there’s a bond between dog and man.

Dogs yawn even when they only hear the sound of their owners doing the same, researchers have found.

A study found that nearly half of all dogs yawned when played a recording of a human being making such a noise.

But when the yawn played belonged to their owners, the canines were five times more likely than if the voice belonged to a stranger.

The researchers said it was further proof that dogs empathize with their owners and understand what they are going through.

In her report behavioral biologist Karine Silva, the lead researcher, said: ‘These results suggest that dogs have the capacity to empathize with humans’.

Previous studies have found that dogs are among the few non-human animals to yawn – others include macaques, baboons and chimpanzees.

When somebody ‘catches’ another person’s yawn it has long been taken as a sign you understand what they are going through – and are tired as well.

To see if canines do the same researchers from University of Porto in Portugal tested 29 dogs which had lived with their owners for at least six months.

They recorded the owners yawning and played the recordings to their dogs, along with the yawn of an unfamiliar woman and a control sound, which was a yawn noise played backwards.

The dogs were given two sessions one week apart and the number of yawns for each noise was monitored.

The results showed that when dogs heard their owners they were by far more likely to yawn than under any other set of circumstances.

Scientists who were not involved in the study said it gave new insight into human and dog relations.

Evan McLean, a Ph.D. student at Duke University’s Canine Cognition Center in Durham, North Carolina, told Science Now: ‘This study tells us something new about the mechanisms underlying contagious yawning in dogs.

‘As in humans, dogs can catch this behavior using their ears alone’.

But Ádám Miklósi, an ethologist at the Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest, raised a note of scepticism and said that previous studies showed dogs looked guilty even when they were not.

He and said: ‘Using behaviors as indicators will only show some similarity in behavior, but it will never tell us whether canine empathy, whatever this is, matches human empathy.

‘Dogs can simulate very well different forms of social interest that could mislead people to think they are controlled by the same mental processes, but they may not always understand the complexity of human behavior.’

The research will be published in the July issue of Animal Cognition.

Attribution: Daily Mail