The Unsettling of Settled Science

by: the Common Constitutionalist

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The only thing settled about science is that it seems never to actually be settled. Yet we stupid people in flyover country who have the nerve to question the “scientific community,” are constantly told how wrong we are.

As we are not intelligent enough, we must therefore relinquish our common sense to the smart people who are more than willing and ready to step in and educate us. Check that. They don’t actually educate us. Rather they just demand we comply because…you know…the science is settled.

Obviously this is the way it is regarding global warming, or climate change. If you don’t believe the science is settled, you are labeled a denier, like some kind of heretic. But it’s not just the science of global warming that the experts claim is settled. Other “settled” sciences have mysteriously become unsettled.

Almost two years ago, March 2015, I wrote an article entitled, “The Silliness of Settled Science.”

In it I chronicled a host of supposedly “settled” sciences such as drinking milk will build strong bones due the calcium in it. Turns out this was not settled. The latest science claims the opposite. Yet for decades we have preached to our children to “drink your milk.” read more

More Liberal Nanny Food Myths Busted

by: the Common Constitutionalist

Politics aside, this past has past year has been pretty productive for those of us trying to live a common sense lifestyle, particularly on the food front.

There was the new research on salt intake. Actually, as it turns out, the new research study has been the only real research study and it showed virtually no link between salt intake and hypertension, which has been the conventional wisdom for as long as I can remember.

I did a Podcast  in March on the subject of salt, where the scientific and medical communities have bought into the myth that salt is bad and must be severely limited.

All this mass hysteria over salt was based on one study done in the 1970s, where the researchers fed massive amounts of salt to mice over an extended period of time and surprise, they developed health problems.

They never followed up with any reasonable human studies – other bogus ones, used only to advance the low/no salt myth, but no reasonable human studies. The myth of salt has been based on a single shoddy research study.

The new research found that not only is a reasonable, commonsense amount of salt not bad, but may very well aid in weight loss. And too little salt, as is currently recommended, can have catastrophic negative health effects.

Then came the new research on saturated fats, where they discovered once again, the claims of health issues like heart disease and stroke is completely unfounded. Once again, the new research found virtually no ill effects when consuming reasonable amounts of saturated fat and cholesterol. In fact they could find little to no link to show cholesterol caused either stroke or heart disease.

But for decades we have been preached to about the dangers of salt and cholesterol laden foods. All unfounded – all bogus. read more

Podcast – Food Myths – Eric Holder the Thug and Rating Bobby Jindal

Today I discuss the myths of salt, fat and new data on cholesterol, Eric Holder threatens and entire city and possible presidential candidate Bobby Jindal. He looks pretty good! read more

Get the Fat Out

Scientists have made a major breakthrough in the prevention of heart attacks after developing a vaccine that dramatically reduces fat in the arteries.

The drug, which can be administered by injection or nasal spray, could be available within five years.

Current treatment involves medication that reduces cholesterol and blood pressure.

But the study by Lund University in Sweden is the first which has targeted the underlying cause of heart disease.

Prof Peter Weissberg, the British Heart Foundation medical director, said the vaccine was ‘very promising’.

Fatty deposits can place great strain on the heart by narrowing the arteries and forcing it to pump far harder.

The fatty plaques build up in the blood vessels feeding the heart and over time become narrowed. Parts of the plaque, known as atheroma, may break off causing a clot to form which can block the artery causing a heart attack.

This treatment works by stimulating the body’s immune system to produce antibodies which tackle this build-up.

Working with Prof Prediman Shah, from Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute in Los Angeles, the team were able to formulate a vaccine that reduced plaque build up by 60 to 70 per cent in mice.

 The resulting injection is waiting regulatory clearance to start clinical trials.

The resulting CVX-210 vaccine, currently in development as an injection by CardioVax, is waiting regulatory clearance to start clinical trials.

A second vaccine using the same materials has been formulated as a nasal spray, Prof Nilsson said.

Prof Nilsson said: “The rationale is that since oxidized LDL plays a major role in the development of atherosclerotic plaques and harmful inflammatory processes, directly targeting oxidized LDL should prevent plaque formation and reduce inflammation.”

Early studies have shown that the antibody, called BI-204, developed jointly by BioInvent and Genentech, reduced plaques by half and was well tolerated when tested in 80 healthy people.

A trial of BI-204 in 144 people with heart disease is underway in America and Canada where body scans will measure plaques in the arteries over time. But Prof Jan Nilsson, professor of experimental cardiovascular research at Lund University, said it was unlikely that the drug would be administered like traditional vaccines in childhood.

 ‘The antibody therapy in particularly is likely to be expensive, so you could probably only afford to give it to high-risk populations rather than everyone,’ he told the Daily Telegraph.

Different ways of administering the vaccine are being developed and could be licensed within five years, the Frontiers in CardioVascular Biology conference at Imperial College London was told.

Attribution: Daily Telegraph

Spice Up Your Life

SAN DIEGO — The food that inspires wariness and tears is on course for inspiring even more wonder. Scientists reported this week the latest evidence that chili peppers are a heart-healthy food with potential to protect against the number one cause of death in the developed world.

The report was part of the 243rd National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society, being held in San Diego this week.

The study focused on capsaicin and its fiery-hot relatives, a piquant family of substances termed “capsaicinoids.” The component that gives cayennes, jalapenos, habaneros and other chili peppers their heat, capsaicin already has an established role in medicine in rub-on-the-skin creams to treat arthritis and certain forms of pain.

Past research suggested that spicing food with chilies can lower blood pressure in people with that condition, reduce blood cholesterol and decrease the tendency for dangerous blood clots to form.

“Our research has reinforced and expanded knowledge about how these substances in chilies work in improving heart health,” said Zhen-Yu Chen, Ph.D., who presented the study. “We now have a clearer and more detailed portrait of their innermost effects on genes and other mechanisms that influence cholesterol and the health of blood vessels. It is among the first research to provide that information.”

The team found, for instance, that capsaicin and a close chemical relative, boost heart health in two ways. They lower cholesterol levels by reducing accumulation of cholesterol in the body and increasing its breakdown and excretion in the feces. That’s number two for those of you in Rio Linda.

They also block action of a gene that makes arteries contract, restricting the flow of blood to the heart and other organs. This blocking action allows more flow through blood vessels.

“We concluded that capsaicinoids were beneficial in improving a range of factors related to heart and blood vessel health,” said Chen, a professor of food and nutritional science at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. “But we certainly do not recommend that people start consuming chilies to an excess. A good diet is a matter of balance. And remember, chilies are no substitute for the prescription medications proven to be beneficial. They may be a nice supplement, however, for people who find the hot flavor pleasant.”

Chen and his colleagues used hamsters for the study. They gave the hamsters high-cholesterol diets, divided them into groups, and supplemented each group’s food with either no capsaicinoids (the control group) or various amounts of capsaicinoids. The scientists then analyzed the effects.

In addition to reducing total cholesterol levels in the blood, capsaicinoids reduced levels of the so-called “bad” cholesterol (which deposits into blood vessels), but did not affect levels of so-called “good” cholesterol. The team found indications that capsaicinoids may reduce the size of deposits that already have formed in blood vessels, narrowing arteries in ways that can lead to heart attacks or strokes.

Capsaicinoids also blocked the activity of a gene that produces cyclooxygenase-2, a substance that makes the muscles around blood vessels constrict. By blocking it, muscles can relax and widen, allowing more blood to flow.

The American Chemical Society is a non-profit organization chartered by the US Congress. With more than 164,000 members, ACS is the world’s largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, DC, and Columbus, Ohio.