Mickelson Retiring??

LA QUINTA, Calif. (TheBlaze/AP) — Phil Mickelson said he will make “drastic changes” because of federal and California state tax increases.

“It’s been an interesting offseason,” Mickelson said Sunday after the final round of the Humana Challenge. “And I’m going to have to make some drastic changes. I’m not going to jump the gun and do it right away, but I will be making some drastic changes.”

The 42-year-old golfer said he would talk in more detail about his plans – possibly moving away from California or even retiring from golf – before his hometown Farmers Insurance Open, the San Diego-area event that starts Thursday at Torrey Pines.

“I’m not sure what exactly, you know, I’m going to do yet,” Mickelson said. “I’ll probably talk about it more in depth next week. I’m not going to jump the gun, but there are going to be some. There are going to be some drastic changes for me because I happen to be in that zone that has been targeted both federally and by the state and, you know, it doesn’t work for me right now. So I’m going to have to make some changes.”  Continue Reading

Golden Apple

For $30,000, you could be the proud owner of a 24-carat gold covered MacBook Pro with an Apple logo that features multi-color diamonds.

Computer Choppers, a company that personalizes high-tech gadgets, also offers the  chance to cover your favorite Apple product in white, rose and yellow gold, as well as copper, black and silver chrome.

The company’s founder, Alex Wiley, explained  to CNNMoney: ‘We’ll take an iMac, an  iPad, a tablet of some sort and we’ll strip it down to bare metal, we’ll engrave or  personalize it for a customer and then go ahead and plate that with 24-karat gold.’

Golden apple: For $30,000, Computer Choppers will cover your laptop in 24-carat gold with an Apple logo that features multi-color diamonds

For $30,000, Computer Choppers will cover your laptop in 24-carat gold with an Apple logo that features multi-color  diamonds

Computer Choppers provides custom engravings, custom logos and  ‘diamond accents on the unibody chassis,’ so it reassembles the product and sends it off to the customer.

And if price is right, the company will coat just about anything, from Nintendo game controllers to iPhones and Blackberries.

The website says: ‘Though we are known for our customized Apple products, we provide our services on most any computer or electronic item.

Gold dipped: Computer Choppers personalizes high-tech gadgets and offers to cover your favorite Apple product in white, rose and yellow gold, as well as copper, black and silver chromeComputer Choppers personalizes high-tech  gadgets and offers to cover your favorite Apple product in white, rose and  yellow gold, as well as copper, black and silver chrome
Customized engravings: 'Exotic graphic plating' is also available, and the designs are created from scratch ‘Exotic graphic plating’ is also  available, and the designs are created from scratch
Printed pattern: The website says: 'There is no limit to the intricacy of the drawing and we are happy to create any type of artwork you request'The website says: ‘There is no limit to  the intricacy of the drawing and we are happy to create any type of artwork you  request’

‘Other specialty plating such as: silver, old english gold, chamagne gold, almond gold, honey gold, rose copper, bronze, and pewter can be requested.’

And ‘exotic graphic plating’ is also  available, which are created from scratch.

‘There is no limit to the intricacy of the drawing and we are happy to create any type of artwork you request,’ the website says.

Cashed up customers: Although Computer Choppers is based in the U.S., Mr Wiley said that 90per cent of the company's orders are shipped internationally Although Computer Choppers is based  in the U.S., Mr Wiley said that 90per cent of the company’s orders are shipped  internationally
Midas touch: The company will coat just about anything, from Nintendo game controllers to iPhones and Blackberries The company will coat just about anything,  from Nintendo game controllers to iPhones and Blackberries
Precious metals: Other specialty plating such as silver, old english gold, chamagne gold, almond gold, honey gold, rose copper, bronze, and pewter can be requestedOther specialty plating such as silver,  old english gold, chamagne gold, almond gold, honey gold, rose copper, bronze,  and pewter can be requested

Although Computer Choppers is based in the  U.S., Mr Wiley said that 90% of the company’s orders are shipped internationally.

He told Business Insider he recently sold a $30,000 13-inch MacBook Pro, a $14,500 Rose Gold Plated iMac with a 24-inch screen, and a $20,000 platinum MacBook Pro with a customized, multi-color diamond logo, to a customer in Azerbaijan.

Attribution: Mail Online

Of Roads and Bridges

by: the Common Constitutionalist

So recently we learned a business person can’t make it on their own (certainly not a solar business). No business owner or entrepreneur ever made it with the great collective. It was thanks to everyone elses efforts. Evidently it does take a village to build a road or a bridge or a business.

I agree with Mitt Romney,  that every entrepreneur or business owner has received at least some assistance somewhere along the way. But he never said, nor does he believe, that someone didn’t build a business through their own sweat, blood and tears.

As an aside, I never thought I’d say, “I agree with Mitt Romney”, but I find myself doing just that. Maybe Mitt has seen the conservative light at the end of the tunnel? I don’t know. What I do know is that Mitt is saying the right things. I also tend to think he may actually believe them due to the conspicuous lack of teleprompters. He appears to be speaking from the heart. One doesn’t need a teleprompter when one is being honest. Obama has shown us that on many occasions; revealing his true, radical self, when he strays from his prepared text. Sorry for the digression.

If it were as King Barack describes, we would all be business owners. But we’re not. Some don’t have the drive or passion. Some don’t wish to work all day and half the night. Some would like to have weekends off. There’s nothing at all wrong with that. We can’t all be chiefs. Every business needs Indians. Employees are needed to do the tasks the owner no longer has time to do, you know, as he grows and expands his business. That doesn’t mean the employee or the neighbor down the street had anything to do with starting the business, anymore than the road or bridge.

To hear Obama describe it, to the cheers and hoorahs of the dimwitted clones in his audiences, the city, state or federal government decide to build a road to nowhere in particular, and the entrepreneur says to himself, ” Gee, look at that road leading to nowhere special. Why don’t I put a business on that road that leads to nowhere. I will go ask the community to help me think up, finance, build and run my business on the road to nowhere in particular.”

I’m sure Henry Ford thought just that. He must have looked out over the countryside, marvelling at all the paved roads. He then said to himself, “Self; The government must have had great forthought in creating these roads and bridges. Maybe I should mass-produce automobiles to take advantage of all the tarred over government maintained former cart paths. I’ll go see President Teddy Roosevelt. He’s a progressive. Surely he will issue me a government grant to build an assembly plant. I’ll even power it by harnessing the wind and the sun. Then I will go on a listening tour of the country, to discover how to build the business, for I have no idea how to achieve success on my own.”

Yes, that’s how Ford did it. Look it up. It’s all there in the history books. 

Another thought: If a company hits a rough patch and has to lay people off  or plans to close all together, the business owner could ask the government to simply repave the road leading to it. That would certainly lead to its re-emergence. We’ll call it the “Tarmac Bailout”.

Although it happens all the time, it’s still very interesting to see everyone tie themselves into knots over a simple, honest statement. The media and Obama sycophants (one in the same), hitting the trail in lock step to attempt to explain away the genuine opinion of a collectivist.

Those of us who understand the president, would expect nothing less of a socialist.

So a Priest, a Minister and a Rabbi…

Who did build that business, then, Mr. President?

by: Vincent Carroll

Let’s be honest: If the nearest priest, minister or rabbi had uttered essentially the same words about personal merit that got President Obama in trouble recently, we’d have hardly thought twice about it.

Reminding high-achievers that they didn’t make it on their own — that they’re not necessarily any smarter or more hard-working than lots of other folks — is a time-honored means of cultivating the virtues of gratitude and humility, not to mention a sense of realism.

But Obama is not a priest, minister or rabbi. He’s a man with his hand on the tiller of economic policy, and his attitude toward entrepreneurs, innovators and business owners in general is of major importance. So when he says, “If you’ve got a business, you didn’t build that,” it tends to grab public attention — despite the creative claims of his campaign to portray his remarks as merely indicating that business owners hadn’t built “roads and bridges.”

Sorry to his campaign, but that’s not what he said. He said they didn’t build their businesses, while deprecating their savvy and hard work as the engines of success.

Now it’s true, as the MaddowBlog quickly pointed out, that Mitt Romney himself made much the same point when he said “a lot of people help you in a business. Perhaps the banks, the investors. There’s no question your mom and dad. Your school teachers. The people that provide roads, the fire, and the police. A lot of people help.”

What Romney did not say, though, was “you didn’t build” your business — and even if he had, there are two big differences between Romney saying it and the president.

First, we know Romney believes in an entrepreneurial culture. He’s lived it. And he extols free enterprise all the time as the foundation of prosperity.

By contrast, Obama’s background is bereft of any significant first-hand experience that might foster respect or sympathy for business owners. To the contrary, he hails from occupational niches — community activism, academia and politics — in which disdain for commerce is quite widespread.

Of course, you can be a law professor or a politician who bucks the ideological tide. Far more telling is that Obama for years has been making similar statements that suggest a decidedly low regard for commerce and the motives of those who flourish within the private sector.

One of these revealing moments occurred four years ago during his commencement address at Wesleyan University, when he exhorted graduates to take up community service. That’s a worthy theme, of course, but consider how he did it.

“There’s no community service requirement in the real world; no one forcing you to care,” he said. “You can take your diploma, walk off this stage, and chase only after the big house and the nice suits and all the other things that our money culture says you should buy. You can choose to narrow your concerns and live your life in a way that tries to keep your story separate from America’s. But I hope you don’t.”

Several times elsewhere in his speech, Obama cited public sector jobs as examples of meaningful work. The candidate basically offered graduates the following choice: meaningful work in the non-profit and public sectors, on the one hand, or money-grubbing that chases big houses and nice suits. To call this a caricature would be kind.

This nation is engaged in a decisive debate about how to revive an economy mired in slow growth and meager job creati0n, so naturally we pay attention to a candidate’s views of how the economy works. If Obama wants critics to stop saying he’s disdainful of business, maybe he should stop providing them with evidence for the charge.

Black Gold

A California family claims it is owed a $130 million stake in Coca-Cola Co after their father bought an antique stock certificate in 2008 for a mere $5.

Tony Marohn spent the final year of his life battling the beverage company after tracing the Palmer Union Oil Co certificate to Coca-Cola.

Marohn died in 2010, but his family has taken on the legal battle, saying it is entitled to about 1.8million shares of the soft-drink maker.

Marohn had traced the certificate by way of long-forgotten companies such as Petrocarbon Chemicals Inc and Taylor Wine Co, according to court documents.

But before the family buys that vacation home in Aspen, they’ll have to convince a skeptical Delaware Chancery Court judge that the law is on their side.

‘This is a new version of the Beverly Hillbillies,’ Judge Leo Strine said at a hearing on January 31, according to a court transcript. He was referring to a 1960s television comedy about a backwoods family that becomes rich by finding oil on their property.

If upheld, Marohn’s estate would become among the largest non-institutional investors in Coca-Cola, according to Reuters data.

‘The claim of Mr Marohn’s estate that it is entitled to millions of dollars in Coca-Cola stock – based on a canceled stock certificate for a long-defunct oil company purchased at an estate sale – is meritless and unfair to the Company’s millions of legitimate shareholders,’ said a Thursday statement from Coca-Cola.

Bob Kerstein, who runs the scripophily.com website, which researches and sells antique stock certificates, said he gets lots of inquiries from people who want to redeem old certificates.

‘We get people who have blank stock certificates and they think they have hit the lotto,’ said Kerstein. He said he has to break the news to them they need to be on record with the company as well.

Margules, the Wilmington, Delaware attorney for Marohn’s estate, said he thinks he can persuade Strine that the law favors his client. Marohn’s certificate was endorsed and assigned, but the transferee was left blank.

Marohn filled in his name and began digging through corporate records. He eventually wrote to Coca-Cola to demand 1.8million shares of common stock for his 1,625 Palmer Union Oil shares.

The company refused, and sued Marohn in Delaware’s Chancery Court in 2009 seeking a declaration he was not entitled to the company’s stock.

Marohn’s estate filed papers last week showing courts have upheld that a person who was issued a stock certificate and then endorsed and assigned it – but left blank the name of the transferee — essentially transformed the certificate into a bearer stock. By writing his name on the stock, Marohn became the legal owner, his estate argued.

Strine said in January he would soon decide how to proceed. He also warned the Marohn estate against pursuing ‘a drive by of a public company’ to extract money to drop the case.

‘It’s just not a sport,’ Strine said.

 
 Attribution: Mail Online