Aston Martin Submarine

Aston Martin style, Triton submersible know-how
Aston Martin style, Triton submersible know-how

After refining its nautical skills on the AM37 powerboat it showed at last year’s Monaco Yacht Show, Aston Martin is back in Monaco talking up another project that puts its design expertise to use at sea. With the Project Neptune submersible, Aston declares its intent to send vessels plunging below the waterline, in addition to speeding across the surface of sea and land. A team-up between Aston Martin and the submersibles experts at Triton Submarines LLC, the new sub lets three people explore the great blue below, all dressed up in their swankiest Aston garb. read more

The Coolest

A 1965 Aston Martin DB5 built for the James Bond film franchise was today put up for sale for a staggering £3million ($4.7 million)

The British sports car firm only made four DB5s for the 007 movies Goldfinger and Thunderball which starred Sean Connery as the super-suave spy.

And this classic model is one of only two of the four originals to be fully decked out with all of Q Branch’s famous gadgets including imitation machine guns, revolving number plates and even the tire-slicing device.

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Piece of film history: One of only four 1965 Aston Martin DB5s to be built for 007 films Goldeneye and Thunderball has been put on the market for £3m
 One of only four 1965 Aston Martin DB5s to be built for 007 films Goldfinger and Thunderball has been put on the market

 

Kitted out: It is also one of only two DB5s to be equipped with Q Branch's famous gadgets at the time it was built - including a tyre-slicer first seen in the 1964 film Goldeneye
 It is also one of only two DB5s to be equipped with Q Branch’s famous gadgets at the time it was built – including a tyre-slicer first seen in the 1964 film Goldfinger

 

The Aston Martin DB5 first appeared in the Bond franchise in the 1964 film Goldeneye starring Sean Connery, pictured next to the classic car, as the famous spy
 The Aston Martin DB5 first appeared in the Bond franchise in the 1964 film Goldfinger starring Sean Connery, pictured next to the classic car, as the famous spy

The DB5 is in pristine condition because it never featured in the films but was instead used for promotion ahead of the release of Thunderball.

Surrey-based Aston Martin specialists RS Williams have now put the DB5 on the market for £3million ($4.7 million)- describing it as ‘the most famous car in the world’.

This makes it one of the most expensive movie cars of all time and almost ten-times the price of a standard DB5.

Under the bonnet of the DB5 is a 4-litre engine which develops around 280bhp – giving the British sports car a top speed of 150mph.

Now you see it: The DB5 also boasts revolving number plates - often used to trick 007's adversaries in Bond films
 The DB5 also boasts revolving number plates – which can change to Swiss, French and English – that were often used to trick 007’s adversaries in Bond films

 

Now you don't: The revolving number plate can show different codes or nothing at all
The revolving number plate can show different codes or nothing at all

 

Undercover car: The extra gadgets - including the revolving licence plates - means the £3 million price tag costs ten times more than the average DB5
 The extra gadgets – including the revolving licence plates – means the £3 million price tag costs ten times more than the average DB5
Back to the best: Models replicating the original models were made to bring the Aston Martin DB5 back for Skyfall starring Daniel Craig
 Models replicating the original DB5 cars were made to bring the Aston Martin DB5 back for Skyfall starring Daniel Craig

But next to the impressive 1960s sports car performance and beautiful design, it is the car’s gadgets and history which have upped its value.

The car boasts revolving number plates, two imitation machine guns, a bulletproof screen to cover the rear window and a radar device built into the dashboard.

Its front and rear bumpers also extend and there is a fitted smoke device to fend off villains.

Many of the gadgets are operated at the flick of a switch via the arm console which opens up to reveal a control panel.

The DB5 was the first ever Aston Martin to feature in a Bond film – 1964’s Goldfinger – and was the start of the iconic partnership that spanned 11 Bond films and 50 years of cinema history.

Lethal weapon: A gadget hidden underneath a rear light releases oil and smoke to make roads slippery and blur the vision of any drivers behind
 A gadget hidden underneath a rear light releases oil and smoke to make roads slippery and blur the vision of any drivers behind

 

Retro: A radar navigation screen is shown in front of the car's gear shift which has a passenger ejection button
 A radar navigation screen is shown in front of the car’s gear shift which has a passenger ejector button

 

Control panel: Switches for rams, guns, screen and oil slick are located next to the driver's seat
 Switches for rams, guns, screen and oil slick are located next to the driver’s seat

This car never appeared on the big screen but was one of two cars used for promotional purposes – touring the USA in 1965 for the release if of Thunderball.

It is regarded as one of the four ‘legitimate’ DB5 Bond cars – and was one of two to have all the gadgets fitted at the time it was built.

Following its PR role, JCB boss and prolific car collector Sir Anthony Bamford bought the DB5 and used it on his Midlands estate.

In 1970 he sold it to an American businessman who held onto it until 2006, when it sold for $2 million.

The main car used in Goldfinger and Thunderball films mysteriously vanishing from a Florida aircraft hangar in the 1990s – making this model the only remaining DB5 that with original gadgets.

In the driver's seat: The 1965 DB5 was the first ever Aston Martin to feature in a James Bond film
 The 1965 DB5 was the first ever Aston Martin to feature in a James Bond film

 

Height of technology: An old-style car phone located in the driver's side door of the Aston Martin
 An old-style car phone located in the driver’s side door of the Aston Martin

 

Globe trotter: The car didn't feature in any of the movie but was used as a promotional car which toured the USA ahead of the release of Thunderball
 The car didn’t feature in any of the movie but was used as a promotional car which toured the USA ahead of the release of Thunderball

In 2010 the other car used in Goldfinger sold for £2.9 million ($4.5 million) at RM Auctions’ Battersea sale – although all of the car’s gadgets were retrofitted following the film series’ success.

Richard Williams, who runs RS Williams, said: ‘We are privileged to offer one of the original James Bond DB5s.

‘It is the most famous car in the world and is a very sought-after model which you get a lot of pleasure from driving.

‘Aston Martin built four models and the most important model was stolen with nobody knowing its whereabouts.

‘This is the joint second most important as it was built with all the gadgets.

‘It is in superb condition and is a great investment. There has been a huge amount of interest in it from all around the world.’

Getaway car: The Aston Martin DB5 can reach top speeds of 150mph - perfect for escaping evil villains
The Aston Martin DB5 can reach top speeds of 150mph – perfect for escaping evil villains
Powerful: The 4-litre engine of the DB5 which develops around 280bhp and can reach top speeds of 150mph
 The 4-litre engine of the DB5 which develops around 280bhp and can reach top speeds of 150mph

Attribution: Mail Online

Bond Car

James Bond’s Aston Martin DB5 was put through a series of huge explosions and stunts during the filming of Skyfall, including one scene which saw the priceless vehicle explode in flames.

However, producers have revealed the secret behind the stunts – if they lost a car, they could simply print another. Yes, that’s right, print another one.

Three replica cars, a third of the size of  the real thing, were created using a large scale 3D printer.

18 individual parts were printed to create the Aston Martin seen on screen18 individual parts were printed to create the Aston  Martin seen on screen

The models double for the priceless original vehicle from the 1960s in the film’s action scenes.

They were made by British firm Propshop Modelmakers Ltd, which specialize in the production of film props, and used Voxeljet to print the cars.

‘Propshop commissioned us to build three plastic models of the Aston Martin DB5,’ voxeljet CEO Dr. Ingo Ederer.

‘We could have easily printed the legendary sports car in one piece at a scale of 1:3 using our high-end VX4000 printer, which can build moulds and models in dimensions of up to eight cubic metres.

‘But the British model builders were pursuing a different approach.

Once assembled, the models were finished by hand, and were indistinguishable from the full sized versions, according the their makersOnce assembled, the models were finished by hand, and were indistinguishable from the full sized versions, according the their makers

‘To ensure that the Aston Martin was as true to detail as possible, and for the purpose of integrating numerous functions into the film models, they decided on an assembly consisting of a total of 18 individual components.

‘The entire body is based on a steel frame, almost identical to how vehicles were assembled in the past,’ said  Ederer.

‘In addition to the automotive industry, foundries, designers and artists, the film industry represents an entirely new customer base for voxeljet.

‘3D printing is on the cusp of a great future in the film industry.

‘The technology offers fantastic opportunities, since it is usually much faster, more precise and more  economical than classic model construction,’ says Ederer.

HOW TO PRINT BOND’S ASTON  MARTIN DB 5

voxeljet CEO Dr. Ingo Ederer with one of the 3D printers used
voxeljet CEO Dr. Ingo Ederer with one of the 3D printers  used

Voxeljet started the printing process once the computer files with the design data for all components were available.

The models are produced with the layer-by-layer application of particle material that is glued together with a binding agent.

As each layer is finished, another is printed on top to build up a 3D model.

The parts are then individually cleaned.

A total of 54 individual parts for the three vehicle models, including mudguards, doors, bonnets, roofs and more, were then packaged and transported to Pinewood Studios near  London.

The model builders at Propshop then meticulously assembled and finished the components, painted them in the original colour and added chrome applications along with realistic-looking bullet holes.

The finished model, which was seen in several key scenes of the filmThe finished model, which was seen in several key scenes  of the film

After the finishing process, it is impossible to distinguish the Aston Martin models made with the voxeljet printer from the original, even in the close-up shots, the firm says.

‘The priceless Aston Martin DB5, which was used in the first James Bond film exactly 50 years ago, remains unscathed, while one of the elaborately and meticulously constructed models explodes in flames in the film,’ it said.

‘An expensive crash, since one of the three models was auctioned off by Christie’s for almost $170,000.

Daniel Craig with the real Aston Martin DB 5Daniel Craig with the real Aston Martin DB 5
Real or model? A close up of one of the model car's bumper and bonnetReal or model? A close up of one of the model car’s  bumper and bonnet