Hooray for Allen West

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From Daniel Halper of The Weekly Standard:

Rep. Allen West (R-Fla.), a former Army lieutenant colonel, sends THE WEEKLY STANDARD an email commenting on the Marines’ video, and has given us permission to publish it.

“I have sat back and assessed the incident with the video of our Marines urinating on Taliban corpses. I do not recall any self-righteous indignation when our Delta snipers Shugart and Gordon had their bodies dragged through Mogadishu. Neither do I recall media outrage and condemnation of our Blackwater security contractors being killed, their bodies burned, and hung from a bridge in Fallujah.

“All these over-emotional pundits and armchair quarterbacks need to chill. Does anyone remember the two Soldiers from the 101st Airborne Division who were beheaded and gutted in Iraq?

“The Marines were wrong. Give them a maximum punishment under field grade level Article 15 (non-judicial punishment), place a General Officer level letter of reprimand in their personnel file, and have them in full dress uniform stand before their Battalion, each personally apologize to God, Country, and Corps videotaped and conclude by singing the full US Marine Corps Hymn without a teleprompter.

“As for everyone else, unless you have been shot at by the Taliban, shut your mouth, war is hell.”

End: Weekly Standard Article

What is a General Officer level letter?

A General Officer level letter or LOR (Letter of Reprimand), is an administrative censure or “chewing out” given to a soldier for a failure to comply with established standards.
It may be filed in either ones Military Personnel Record Jacket (MPRJ) or Official Military Personnel File (OMPF).

A LOR filed in a soldier’s MPRJ can only be made by an enlisted soldier’s immediate commander (or a higher commander in his/her chain of command), school commandant, any general officer or an officer exercising general court-martial jurisdiction over the soldier. Letters
filed in your MPRJ may remain for up to three years or until you are reassigned to a new general court-martial jurisdiction, whichever is sooner.

A LOR filed in a soldier’s OMPF, regardless of the issuing authority, can only be filed upon the order of a general officer senior to the soldier, or by direction of an officer having general court-martial jurisdiction over the soldier. Letters filed in your OMPF are permanently placed in the performance fiche (P-fiche), and may adversely affect your military career in the future. Moreover, the LOR is also placed in your MPRJ as long as it remains in your P-fiche.

So what is an Article 15?

Within the UCMJ (Uniform Code of Military Justice) is a provision for punishing misconduct through judicial proceedings like a court-martial.
The UCMJ also gives commanders the authority to impose nonjudicial punishment, described in the UCMJ under Article 15. Article 15 provides commanders an essential tool in maintaining discipline. The Article allows commanders to impose punishment for relatively minor infractions. Only commanders may impose punishment under Article 15. A commander is any warrant officer or commissioned officer that is in command of a unit and has been given authority under AR 600-20, either orally or in writing, to administer nonjudical punishment.

Article 15s come in different levels: Summarized, Company Grade and Field Grade. They differ in two main respects: the severity of the punishment and in how the record of it can affect a soldier’s future in the Military.

Maximum Punishments In Article 15:

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