Boron Hydrogel Helps Muscles Heal

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A newly developed hydrogel could greatly accelerate the recovery times for damaged muscles, by flooding the injury site with boron
A newly developed hydrogel could greatly accelerate the recovery times for damaged muscles, by flooding the injury site with boron

 

Over the past few years we’ve seen some interesting examples of how injectable hydrogels can boost the recovery of damaged muscles and tendons, whether by flooding them with stem cells or acting as supporting scaffolds. Scientists in Spain have now developed a hydrogel that releases boron to dramatically accelerate the formation of new muscle fibers.

The new biomaterial was developed by researchers at the Polytechnic University of Valencia and the Center for Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine. It is described as a boron-loaded alginate hydrogel, and is designed to be delivered to the site of damaged muscle via subcutaneous injection, where the boron is released and kicks off a chain reaction of events that aid muscle regeneration.

As the boron makes its way into the muscles, it stimulates proteins called integrins, which promote adhesion between the cells and the extracellular matrix, the supportive structure that helps them build up into tissue. This has the effect of triggering a greater amount of adhesions of a larger size, which connects undifferentiated muscle cells to produce myotubes and in turn fresh muscle fibers.

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