Department of Departments Department

All this talk of raising the debt ceiling & cutting the budget or not cutting the budget has been angering me to no end. There is nothing that can be cut? Come on, nothing? I’ve wanted to vent about it for a while now but wasn’t sure where to begin. So, being the geek that I am, I decided to go back and look over my Constitution. You know, the document that lays out how the government should run & what it can & can’t do. Now I know the government has gotten way too large & intrusive but even I was stunned when I found a site that lists all of its departments. Small wonder it takes 3.5 trillion dollars to run this behemoth. If you are of strong mind & body, click on the link below.

http://www.usa.gov/Agencies/Federal/All_Agencies/index.shtml

In my estimation, we could axe 50% (conservatively) of these departments by privatizing or simply doing away with them. As I perused the list it just fortified my belief that most of what the Federal government does is unconstitutional. As a practical note, who could possibly argue that the government could do a better job at anything than the private sector! Well, I don’t feel any better but that will have to do for now.

Separation of Church & State

So, I got into a discussion about this at the gym yesterday. What was I thinking? How is it that no one seems to know this stuff?

Despite popular belief, the separation of Church & State clause is no more in the constitution than the Santa clause. In 1947 a progressive Supreme Court justice, Hugo Black (appointed by the evil Franklin Roosevelt), somehow found it in the First Amendment establishment clause. You know it. “Congress shall make no law respecting the establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise there of.” Black evidently saw something the founders didn’t & said, “ The first amendment has erected a wall between church & state. That wall must be kept high & impregnable. We cannot approve the slightest breach”. Kind of like the fence at our southern border, eh? It’s funny how judges refuse to look for our framers original intent. It’s not hard to find. I did. Thomas Jefferson explained it as a prevention of the establishment of a national religion. I understand that, but then I’m not a justice. Let’s see what James Madison said. You know, the guy that wrote the Constitution! He said, “ The people fear one sect might obtain a preeminence, or two combine together, and establish a religion to which they would compel others to conform.” How about we just go back to the constitution & stop relying on case law.

Soros Hedge Fund

So George, call me Jepedo, Soros has decided to take his Quantum Hedge Fund private. Wonder why he’s doing that? Well, the explanation is that new financial laws will cause conflicts of interest & investor reporting problems with the SEC. The new law reguires hedge funds to report outside investor information. Why would that be a problem? Why would an investor not want people to know he was invested in “The Devil’s” hedge fund? I, for one, would love to know who’s in bed with that evil bastard. I’m just sayin.

Republican spending cuts are Draconian

So I just heard Speaker Boehner touting the latest “Compromise”. It will cut spending by a whopping 1 trillion dollars (over 10 years). That’s a lot of money. Can we handle such deep & radical cuts? Not according to the dems. But a real quick & honest calculation will show us the following: 1 trillion over 10 years = 100 billion a year. We are currently borrowing between 100 & 140 billion per month (not per year). So the big spending cuts for the whole year will be absorbed in the first month they take place. UGH!

Subsidizing Big Oil

 

So let’s take away the subsidy (definition below) the government provides to the evil oil companies. There’s a problem though. The government doesn’t do that. They do, however, provide them with tax deductions. You know, the kind that allowed GE to pay less in taxes than the average welfare recipient. Here’s a summary of the tax deductions the oil companies are afforded.

1. Intangible Drilling costs — this is merely a deduction for 100% of the exploration costs in the year they are spent. It’s only 70% for big oil companies in the first year.

2. Foreign tax credit — allows companies to offset taxes paid to other countries.

3. Domestic Manufacturer’s Deduction — allows a deduction of 9% of income earned from anyone manufacturing, producing, growing or extracting in the United States except for oil companies. They only get a 6% deduction.

4. Depletion allowance — available to oil and mining companies and is a deduction of a percentage of the gross income from a well or mine to take into consideration that the well or mine will eventually run dry. Not available to companies that refine and market it, i.e., the big oil companies.

5. LIFO — last in first out is an accounting practice that provides that companies sell the most recently acquired inventory items first. Profits are reduced by the cost of the goods sold, and the higher the cost the lower the taxable profit. Companies in industries experiencing rising prices generally prefer LIFO accounting.

6. Expensing tertiary recovery injectants — companies are currently allowed to treat as an expense the cost of the stuff they pump into the ground to break loose trapped oil and gas.

7. Geological and Geophysical costs — small companies can expense exploration costs over two years, big oil companies can do it over seven years.

8. EOR and Marginal well credits — apply only when oil prices are much lower than they are now, $42 for EOR credit and $27 for marginal well credit, and were implemented to encourage production when oil prices are low.

 sub·si·dy

 /ˈsʌbdi/ Show Spelled[suhb-si-dee] Show IPA

–noun, plural -dies.

1.

a direct pecuniary aid furnished by a government to a private industrial undertaking, a charity organization, or the like.
2.

a sum paid, often in accordance with a treaty, by one government to another to secure some service in return.
3.

a grant or contribution of money.

Bipartisanship

 

So…. bipartisanship, what does it mean & why it so great? Why is it so bad to be partisan? A partisan is one who supports or adheres to an ideal, group, person, etc. What wrong with that? Seems to me everyone is partisan in one-way or another. Bipartisanship, in my opinion, is just code for, I really don’t stand for anything & I’m certainly not willing to fight for it. History must be awash with great bipartisan agreements. I just can’t think of a single one off hand.

          It’s funny how the term never comes up until the democrats lose their majority. Imagine if a conservative (notice I didn’t say republican) had said this. “ We don’t mind the democrats joining us. They can come for the ride, but they gotta sit in back.”  That’s not very bipartisan. The actual quote was attributed to Obama before the last midterm elections when the dems controlled both houses & the oval office. To get the real quote, just substitute the democrats for republicans.

           I follow this stuff pretty close & I don’t recall a single call for bipartisanship from 2006 to 2010. Prove me wrong.

           Today, that word can be defined, as conservatives must compromise their values & position. Never the other way around.

My How Times Have Changed

 

 

The Following is then Senator Barack Obama’s Senate floor speech in March, 2006.

He voted against raising the debt ceiling as did every other major democrat hack at the time!

 

“The fact that we are here today to debate raising America’s debt limit is a sign of leadership failure. It is a sign that the U.S. Government can’t pay its own bills. It is a sign that we now depend on ongoing financial assistance from foreign countries to finance our Government’s reckless fiscal policies.”

“Over the past 5 years, our federal debt has increased by $3.5 trillion to $8.6 trillion.That is “trillion” with a “T.” That is money that we have borrowed from the Social Security trust fund, borrowed from China and Japan, borrowed from American taxpayers. And over the next 5 years, between now and 2011, the President’s budget will increase the debt by almost another $3.5 trillion.”

“Numbers that large are sometimes hard to understand. Some people may wonder why they matter. Here is why: This year, the Federal Government will spend $220 billion on interest. That is more money to pay interest on our national debt than we’ll spend on Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program. That is more money to pay interest on our debt this year than we will spend on education, homeland security, transportation, and veterans benefits combined. It is more money in one year than we are likely to spend to rebuild the devastated gulf coast in a way that honors the best of America.”

“And the cost of our debt is one of the fastest growing expenses in the Federal budget. This rising debt is a hidden domestic enemy, robbing our cities and States of critical investments in infrastructure like bridges, ports, and levees; robbing our families and our children of critical investments in education and health care reform; robbing our seniors of the retirement and health security they have counted on.”

“Every dollar we pay in interest is a dollar that is not going to investment in America’s priorities.”