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Game Controller for iPad

Gizmag takes a quick look at our favorite physical control scheme for iOS devices, the GameviceGizmag takes a quick look at our favorite physical control scheme for iOS devices, the Gamevice (Credit: Will Shanklin/Gizmag)

The Gamevice is pretty much the ideal way to add physical controls to an iPad mini. Strapping it onto your tablet is less like using an accessory and more like transforming your iPad into an iOS-powered portable game console.

If you search somewhere like Amazon or Best Buy for iOS game controllers, almost everything you see will either be a sunflower-style controller that props your device up above, or a standalone gamepad that you hold separately from your phone or tablet. You’ll see a few that latch onto the sides of the device like the Gamevice, but they’re all pretty old and only compatible with obsolete (two years old at the most recent) Apple devices. read more

New Emojis are on the Way

Just months after the Unicode Consortium released its latest range of emoji, Apple has added a number of these symbols to its emoji keyboard.

Developers with early access to the files of Apple’s iOS 9.1 have spotted more than a dozen new additions including a wedge of cheese, a unicorn, taco, a champagne bottle, a weightlifter and a mosque.

Apple’s iOS 9 will be rolled out to all devices on 16 September and iOS 9.1 could be released as soon as the end of the year.    

Developers with early access to the files of Apple's iOS 9.1 have spotted more than a dozen new additions to the emoji keyboard including a wedge of cheese, a taco, a burrito, chili pepper, new faces, a spider, crab, scorpion, and squirrel as well as a robot, unicorn, lion and turkey

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Smartwatch Hack

Smartwatches are packed full of sensors to help you track fitness, heart rate, location and more, but these very sensors can also put you at risk.

Computer scientists have developed an app that sits on the watches and captures data from these motion sensors as the wearer types on a keyboard.

These movements are then sent to a ‘hacker’ who determines which keys are being pressed and in what order, potentially revealing banking passwords, login details and private emails.

Computer scientists have developed an app that sits on smartwatches and captures data from motion sensors as the wearer types on a keyboard (pictured). These movements are sent to a 'hacker' who determines which keys are being pressed and in what order, potentially revealing passwords and login details

Computer scientists have developed an app that sits on smartwatches and captures data from motion sensors as the wearer types on a keyboard (pictured). These movements are sent to a ‘hacker’ who determines which keys are being pressed and in what order, potentially revealing passwords and login details

The ‘attack system’ was created by Associate professor Romit Roy Choudhury and his team at the University of Illinois.

It has been called Motion Leaks through Smartwatch Sensors, or MoLe, and was demonstrated using a Samsung Gear Live watch.

The researchers began by typing while wearing the watch, with the app installed, and tracking keystrokes.  read more

iPhone 6 vs. Galaxy S6

How does the new iPhone 6s (left) compare with the Samsung Galaxy S6?How does the new iPhone 6s (left) compare with the Samsung Galaxy S6?

Wondering how Apple’s new iPhone 6s compares to its biggest rival on the Android side of the fence, the Samsung Galaxy S6? Let’s take a look at how their features and specs match up.

Size

The Galaxy S6 and its curved sibling, the Galaxy S6 edge, are both a little bigger than the new iPhone: the GS6 is 4 percent taller and 6 percent wider, while the GS6 edge is 3 percent taller and 4 percent wider.

The iPhone 6s is a bit thicker than last year’s iPhone 6. That has the 6s measuring 4 percent thicker than the Galaxy S6 and just a hair thicker than the S6 Edge. Just remember that, relatively speaking, all three are very thin phones. read more

How to Save Snapchat Video

Snapchat is one of the most popular apps used today for sharing quick photos and videos, which disappear within a few seconds after viewing. To save Snapchat videos before they’re gone for good, you have a few options to try out. - Photo © Peter Macdiarmid / Getty Images

Saving Your Own Snapchat Videos: Easy!

If all you want to do is figure out how to save your own videos, then the solution is ridiculously easy. You simply do it the same way you save a photo before posting it.

  1. Film your video by holding the big red button down for as long as you want.
  2. Tap the downward arrow button that appears between the timer and the story buttons in the bottom left corner of the screen.

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Google’s Cardboard VR Gear

By now you’ve probably heard about virtual reality. (Heck, the technology has even found its way into a Hot Pockets commercial!) But while some of the more famous virtual-reality devices include the Oculus Rift ($350 for version two of the development kit) and the Gear VR ($200), you’ll find an intriguing device at the other end of the price spectrum.  -

Enter Google Cardboard. Originally introduced at the company’s developer-focused I/O conference in 2014, this device is made of (you’ve guessed it) cardboard, and is essentially a mount for a smartphone. read more

What is Jott?

When it comes to predicting what the next big social app is going to be, teens are always right on the ball before everyone else. Instagram, Kik Messenger, Snapchat, Yik Yak, you name it — they all start with a young audience and blow up from there.

The latest one is called Jott, and it’s a messaging app kids are flocking to download by the masses for one very specific reason: they have a lot of friends they want to chat with, but they don’t have data plans for their mobile devices! read more

Is a Smart TV Worth Owning?

Once upon a time smart TVs made all kinds of sense. Turn the clock back a few years and the television sat right at the heart of family life. It was our only source of video entertainment, and we all used to gather around it to watch things together like earlier generations used to gather around the fireplace. It’s not for nothing that Panasonic used to refer to the television as a ‘digital hearth’.

 Against this backdrop, it seemed totally logical once the internet arrived that we should want our televisions to be more than just dumb reproducers of pictures and sound – and so the smart TV was born. The ability of smart TVs to go online and bring the brave new world of apps, information and video streaming directly into our homes without the need for any kind of intermediary PC felt perfectly natural.

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