We Can’t Drill Our Way Out!

 North Dakota Oil Boom Exposes Obama’s ‘Self-Serving Falsehood’

North Dakota is experiencing such a boom in revenues from oil production that voters actually considered a measure to abolish the state’s property taxes.

Although the measure was defeated in the June 12 vote, the fact that it was even considered points to the incredible economic opportunities enjoyed by North Dakota residents due to unfettered oil production.

“It turns out that, yes, we can drill our way out of our problems,” Investor’s Business Daily (IBD) observes in an editorial.

“If you can see a pattern here, you’re way ahead of President Obama. His argument is that we can’t drill our way out of high energy prices let alone out of debt and the need for higher taxes. But it’s about to be exposed once again as the self-serving falsehood it is.”

North Dakota in March pumped oil at the rate of 575,490 barrels per day, replacing California as the nation’s No. 3 oil-producing state behind Texas and Alaska. At its current rate of production growth, North Dakota will likely surpass Alaska sometime this year.

Continental Resources, which operates 10 percent of the drilling rigs in North Dakota, estimates there are more than 900 billion barrels of oil in place.

Only 27 billion to 45 billion barrels are currently recoverable using today’s technology, but that amount will grow as technology advances. So let’s meet halfway and say 36 billion barrels. That’s 4% of estimates.

A current extraction rates, that’s about 173 years.

Thanks to the energy boom, North Dakota has the nation’s lowest unemployment rate at just over 3 percent, and Williams County — at the center of the drilling boom — boasts the lowest jobless rate in the country at just 0.7 percent.

Oil revenues in the state generated some $840 million in fiscal 2011 and are expected to deliver more than $2 billion over the next two years. State per-capita income is $4,000 above the national average.

“The North Dakota oil boom has occurred on private and state lands, unfettered by federal edict that has placed out of reach much of the estimated 200-year supply of oil within our borders,” IBD stated, noting that 94 percent of federal onshore lands and 97 percent of federal offshore lands are off-limits to oil and gas drilling.

As the Insider Report disclosed earlier, the Green River Formation, a largely vacant area where Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming come together, contains about as much recoverable oil as all the rest of the world’s proven reserves combined.

But most of the oil is beneath federal land overseen by the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management, and the government has “locked up” development of the huge resource.

“Critics will say North Dakota is a small state and its success couldn’t be replicated nationwide,” IBD concludes. “Oh, yes it can.

“We can cut taxes, boost employment and jump-start economic growth if we tap into that 200-year supply of oil and back oil-extraction technology with as much enthusiasm as the Obama administration backs electric cars and high-speed rail.”

If experts claim to have calculated a 200 year supply, I contend it is likely a lot more.

Attribution: NewsMax

World’s Oldest Handbag

Excavators have unearthed what they believe to be the world’s oldest handbag, a Stone Age purse dated between 2,500 and 2,200 BC which is decorated in over 100 canine teeth.

The incredible discovery – the first of its kind – was made in a grave which forms part of an ancient burial ground on a 250-acre excavation site near Leipzig, Germany.

More than 100 tightly packed dog teeth were found inside the grave on the site at Profen, and Susanne Friederich, the archaeologist who managed the dig, believes they originally formed the decorative outer flap of a Stone Age handbag.

Ms Friedrich, of the Sachsen-Anhalt State Archaeology and Preservation Office, said: ‘Over the years the leather or fabric disappeared, and all that’s left is the teeth.

‘They’re all pointing in the same direction, so it looks a lot like a modern handbag flap.

‘It’s the first time we can show direct evidence of a bag like this.’

The dig is just one phase of an enormous excavation project being undertaken before the Profen site is turned into an open-pit coal mine, due to take place in 2015.

So far the team has uncovered evidence of Stone and Bronze Age settlements, including more than 300 graves, hundreds of stone tools, spear points, ceramic vessels, bone buttons and an amber necklace.

There have also been thousands of finds from later periods, including the 50BC grave of a woman who was buried with half a kilogram of gold jewelry.

While the dog-tooth handbag is extremely rare, canine teeth are actually a fairly common find in Stone Age burial sites in northern and central Europe, Friederich told the National Geographic.

In fact, so many teeth have been excavated from graves around the region that it suggests dogs were as much livestock to Stone Age man as they were pets – the handbag’s decorative panel alone required the teeth of dozens of animals.

Most commonly, dog teeth were used as hair ormaments and in necklaces for both men and women.

In other Stone Age burial sites, dog and wolf teeth – as well as shells – have been uncovered in patterns suggesting corpses were covered with studded blankets, the material of which has long since disintegrated.

‘It seems to have been very fashionable at the time,’ said Harald Staueble, senior archaeologist at Germany’s Saxon State Archaeology Office.

‘Not everyone was buried with such nice things—just the really special graves.’

Attribution: Mail Online, Archaeology.org

EPA of the Forth Reich

Many of America’s farmers and ranchers will face economic challenges due to the Environmental Protection Agency’s plan to regulate greenhouse gases, the American Farm Bureau Federation told a House subcommittee.

Carl Shaffer, president of the Pennsylvania Farm Bureau, testified on behalf of AFBF before the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power.

“Costs incurred by utilities, refiners, manufacturers and other large emitters to comply with GHG regulatory requirements will be passed on to the consumers of those products, including farmers and ranchers,” Shaffer said. “The end result is that our nation’s farmers and ranchers will be forced to contend with higher input costs to grow food, fiber and renewable fuels.”

Shaffer said farmers will face another economic hit when regulations are fully phased in under EPA’s “tailoring” approach which will apply to farms and ranches that emit, or have the potential to emit, more than 100 tons of greenhouse gases per year. Those farms and ranches will be required to apply for and obtain a Title V operating permit. Based on EPA’s numbers, Shaffer said just the expense of obtaining permits would cost agriculture more than $866 million.

In his testimony, Shaffer expressed Farm Bureau’s support for the House-passed Energy Tax Prevention Act of 2011, which prevents EPA from regulating greenhouse gases. Farm Bureau opposes the regulation of greenhouse gases by EPA under the Clean Air Act.

Attribution: Farm Press

Giraffe

When this unlikely guest took a dip in a club house swimming pool, he had no trouble keeping his head above the water… which is not surprising since he’s a giraffe.

In fact, three-and-a-half-year-old Monduli is a regular sight at the Kilimanjaro Golf and Wildlife Estate in Tanzania.

The leggy swimmer is the only giraffe at the estate after being rescued as a baby by the anti-poaching unit of the Wildlife Department of the Tanzanian Government.

Workers at the estate said Monduli thinks he’s a cross between a guest and a horse and is often up to mischief trying to play football, polo and taking a dip in the pool.

Monduli is well over 13ft tall (4m) and will reach 18ft when fully grown at around six years old.

Zummi Cardoso, general manager at the estate, said Monduli was quite lonely as the only member of his species there.

He said: ‘He has been with us for about three years and we bottle and bucket-fed him milk for more than a year.

‘He is accompanied by lots of zebra, wildebeest and gazelles but he thinks he is a human being, hence the dip in the pool.

‘Monduli sometimes joins in football games at the polo club and regularly scares visiting polo ponies. He loves to take part in any activities at the club and even if he’s not welcome he cannot be easily dissuaded.’

Zummi said as well as being a lively character around the estate, Monduli also acted as a gardener.

He said: ‘He regularly trims all the plants around the club when he has had enough of the ample acacias we have on the estate.

‘He’s also a bit of a pervert when it comes to cars. One or two seem to get his attention and he has attempted to mount those chosen ones.

‘He got his leg caught between the bumper of our pick-up and dragged it for more than a meter to get dislodged.’

The Kilimanjaro Golf and Wildlife Estate is located near the town of Usa River, approximately 30 minutes’ drive from both Arusha and Kilimanjaro International Airport.

The estate provides spectacular views of Mount Kilimanjaro and Mount Meru to the north and over the vastness of the Maasai Steppe to the south.

Attribution: Mail Online

EPA Get’s Cut to the Bone

House appropriators advance spending bill that would slash the EPA’s funding

from: Erika Johnsen at HotAir:

Ah, such a tease! I can’t say I have much faith that, the way things stand right now, this bill will get any traction, but it’s beautiful to think about nonetheless.

In May a House committee has managed to advance a 2013 spending bill that would impose deep cuts and restrictions on the Environmental Protection Agency.

The bill cuts EPA by $1.4 billion, about 17 percent, compared to current funding. The GOP points out that this brings the EPA below fiscal 1998 funding.

House Appropriations Committee Chairman Hal Rogers (R-Ky.), who hails from coal country, said he is especially proud of the measure, which was advanced from subcommittee to the full spending panel on a voice vote.

“This represents the strong concerns of this Congress over the EPA’s unprecedented effort

Lisa Jackson, Head Thug

to drive certain industries to extinction with a cocktail of burdensome regulations, questionable guidance policies, and arbitrary enforcement measures — all designed to shut down the permitting process for energy exploration and production,” he said.

It contains a number of environmental riders, including one to prevent the EPA from regulating greenhouse gases using New Source Performance Standards and one stopping EPA from expanding its ability to regulate “navigable waters” under the Clean Water Act.

The bill contains several riders, including one that would stop the EPA from using the New Source Performance Standards to regulate greenhouse gases and another that would prevent them from expanding their authority to regulate “navigable waters” under the Clean Water Act (case in point: That one was their excuse for crucifying — woops, I meant persecuting — an Idaho couple in the egregious case of Sackett v. EPA).

I’ve made no secret of my unadulterated disdain for the Environmental Protection Agency — while I think there can be such a thing as effective government environmental regulation, the EPA is a wildly intrusive, power-tripping, practically unbridled band of overzealous environmentalist crusaders who are often conveniently disallowed from considering the costs of their policies because they ostensibly have only the “public’s best interest in mind”. Their frivolous litigation, crippling sanctions, and uncertainty-inducing agenda are some of the more significant obstacles our economy faces.

I dare not even consider the possibility that the EPA could someday be eliminated, but the thought of at least watching them take any kind of a hit that could rein in some of their wanton regulatory ways, instead of being allowed to metastasize even more, pleases me to no end. (Especially since, you know, we’ve been operating at above trillion-dollar deficits and a lot of stuff has just got to go.)

Politico and certain Democrats have labeled Republicans’ various efforts to put the brakes on some of the EPA’s forthcoming rules and regulations as an “attack”.

This is just the latest round of Republican attacks that has forced the White House to hold back on new environmental regulations, lawmakers say — at least for now.

“They have slowed down some of that stuff, but it’s only until after the election,” Rep. Mike Simpson (R-Idaho) said. “After that, it’s going to be scary.” …

“The unrelenting attacks by the Republicans on environmental protection, I think, have caused people in the administration to be careful to pick their fights,” said California Rep. Henry (nostrilitis) Waxman, the top Democrat hack on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

You’re darn straight it’s an attack — I should hope that Republicans keep on engaging in a full-frontal assault on the out-of-control independent agency that manages to kill jobs and opportunities like its their sole purpose in life.

Terabit Internet

If you want ultra-fast wireless internet, just get light to do the twist.

The wireless and fibre-optic links that make up the internet use electromagnetic waves to carry data as a series of pulses at a specific frequency. It is possible to increase the amount of data transmitted at a given frequency by twisting light beams in different ways. Each beam has a different angular momentum and acts as an independent channel in a larger, composite, beam.

Now Jian Wang, Alan Willner and colleagues at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles have used the twisting technique to transmit over a terabit of data per second. By comparison home WiFi routers typically run at around 50 megabits per second.

Because there are many ways to twist light, the team was able to combine beams with eight different types of twist, each carrying its own independent sequence of pulses.

Willner says the technique could be used between satellites in space, or over shorter distances on Earth. “It’s another dimension by which you can transmit data.”

Right now, it works only in free-space as current fibre-optic technology distorts twisted light.

Attribution: New Scientist

I Should’ve taken the Blue Pill

by: the Common Constitutionalist

Remember this? (video below) I do. I also recall how Sarah Palin was savaged by the lefties for daring to speak the truth regarding the implmentation of “Death Panels” with the inactment of Obamacare.

Well folks, welcome to real life. Those of you non-believers will just have to wait for the truth of this monstrosity to be fully revealed. At this minute new regulations are being crafted by unelected beaurocrats. You read that correctly. The law is in place but the rules & regulations are still being written. In other words, no one, including those who originated the law, have any idea what it will morph into. That’s what Bella (I want to suck your wallet) Pelosi meant by, ” You have to pass the bill to find out what’s in it”.

That regulatory burden will fall on people like Czar Cass (Philip Dru, Administrator) Sunstein. Beck doesn’t call him the “Most dangerous man in America” for nothing. If he could, he would mandate how many beats your heart can make per day.

Now that the Supremes have brushed aside the pesky, majority of the American population, things will begin to implement more rapidly, although, will not be evident until after the election.

If you are over 50 with a medical condition beyond that of a common cold, be prepared to have your medical care limited. If your north of seventy, and not independently wealthy, good luck.

If you are a travel agent, I would suggest you consider getting in on the ground floor of a burdgeoning new industry, medical tourism.

Hurricane season will be arriving a bit late this year. It will begin on November 7th.